Method and systems for securing remote access to private networks

Abstract

A method for securing remote access to private networks includes a receiver intercepting from a data link layer a packet in a first plurality of packets destined for a first system on a private network. A filter intercepts from the data link layer a packet in a second plurality of packets transmitted from a second system on the private network, destined for an system on a second network. A transmitter in communication with the receiver and the filter performing a network address translation on at least one intercepted packet and transmitting the at least one intercepted packet to a destination.

Claims

1. A method of routing packets, the method comprising: (a) intercepting, at a data link layer by a filter executing in a kernel space of a client operating in a first network, an outbound network packet transmitted from an application of the client to a server, the server operating in a second network, the filter terminating a first transport layer connection with the application; (b) transmitting , by the filter, the outbound network packet to a port monitored by a client application at an application layer executing in a user space of the client, the client application terminating a second transport layer connection with a gateway and communicating with the gateway via a secure application layer tunnel over the second transport layer connection; (c) receiving, by the gateway, the outbound network packet via the secure application layer tunnel over the second transport layer connection from the client application; (d) forwarding, by the gateway via a third transport layer connection with the server, the outbound network packet to the server; and (e) intercepting at a data link layer by a capture driver executing in the gateway, a second network packet transmitted from the server to the client. 2. The method of claim 1 , wherein step (c) further comprises receiving, by a gateway application executing in an application space of the gateway, the outbound network packet via the secure application layer tunnel over the transport layer connection. 3. The method of claim 1 , wherein step (c) further comprises performing, by a gateway application executing in an application space of the gateway, network address translation (NAT) on the outbound network packet. 4. The method of claim 3 , wherein step (c) further comprises establishing, by the gateway application, a private address of the destination in the second network as the destination address of the outbound network packet. 5. The method of claim 3 , wherein step (c) further comprises establishing, by the gateway application, a private address of the client in the second network as the source address of the outbound network packet. 6. The method of claim 1 , wherein step (d) further comprises forwarding the outbound network packet over a second secure tunnel over a second transport layer connection to the server. 7. The method of claim 1 , wherein step (b) further comprises transmitting , by the filter, the outbound network packet to a port responsive to a filter table. 8. The method of claim 7 , further comprising identifying, by the gateway, the public address of the client in the first network based on a private address of the client in the second network. 9. The method of claim 7 , further comprising forwarding, by the gateway, the second network packet via the secure application layer tunnel to the client application. 10. The method of claim 1 , wherein the client application and the gateway establish the second transport layer connection, and the gateway and server establish the third transport layer connection, the client and the server communicating packets via the first, second and third transport layer connections. 11. The method of claim 1 , further comprising applying, by a frame monitor of the client, a policy to the outbound network packet. 12. The method of claim 1 , further comprising applying, by a frame monitor of the client, an access control list to the outbound network packet. 13. The method of claim 1 , further comprising associating, by an addressing element of the client, a private IP address with the public address of the server. 14. A system of routing packets, the system comprising a filter executing in a kernel space of a client device operating in a first network, the filter intercepting at a data link layer an outbound network packet transmitted from an application of the client device to a server operating in a second network, and transmitting the outbound network packet to a port monitored by a client application at an application layer executing in a user space of the client device, the filter terminating a first transport layer connection with the application; and a gateway comprising; a processor, receiving the outbound network packet from the client application via a secure application layer tunnel over a second transport layer connection terminated by the client application, and forwarding the outbound network packet to the server via a third transport layer connection with the server, and a capture driver intercepting at a data link layer a second network packet transmitted from the server to the client device. 15. The system of claim 14 , wherein a gateway application executing in an application space of the gateway further receives the outbound network packet via the secure application layer tunnel over the transport layer connection. 16. The system of claim 15 , wherein the gateway application further performs a network address translation (NAT) on the outbound network packet. 17. The system of claim 15 , wherein the gateway application further establishes a private address of the server in the second network as the destination address of the outbound network packet. 18. The system of claim 15 , wherein the gateway application further establishes a private address of the client device in the second network as the source address of the outbound network packet. 19. The system of claim 14 , wherein the gateway further forwards the outbound network packet over a second secure tunnel over a second transport layer connection to the server. 20. The system of claim 14 , wherein the filter transmits the outbound network packet to the port responsive to a filter table. 21. The system of claim 20 , wherein the gateway application further identifies the public address of the client device in the first network based on a private address of the client device in the second network. 22. The system of claim 21 , wherein the gateway further forwards the second network packet via the secure application layer tunnel to the client application. 23. The system of claim 14 , wherein the client application and the gateway establish the second transport layer connection, and the gateway and server establish the third transport layer connection, the client device and the server communicating packets via the first, second and third transport layer connections.
RELATED APPLICATIONS This present application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/590,837, entitled “Ad Hoc Distributed Networks And Remote Access Architecture,” filed Jul. 23, 2004, and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/601,431, entitled “System And Method For Assuring Redundancy In Remote Access Solutions,” filed Aug. 13, 2004, and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/607,420, entitled “Virtual Network Bridging”, filed Sep. 3, 2004, and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/634,379, entitled “Securing Access to Private Networks from End Points Based on Encryption and Authentication Technology Built into the USB or Other Peripheral Devices Without the Need for Additional Software on the Host Operating System”, filed Dec. 7, 2004, all of which are incorporated herein by reference. FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a method and systems for securely accessing private networks from remote locations. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Organizations have a general problem of providing remote access to private networks for employees and partner organizations. Establishing a remote access link with a mobile worker or a remote business partner allows enterprises to attain productivity gains while reducing cost. Further, such links can facilitate and accelerate business-to-business (B2B) transactions. However, employees and business partners wishing to access information remotely from another private or public network are potentially behind other security and firewall equipment, which ordinarily prevents access to the organization's network. Without a specific solution to address this issue, employees and partner organizations are not able to access information without being physically connected to the organization's private network, for example, by obtaining a network address on the organization's network to physically connect to it. Organizations would like to solve this problem for providing remote access to trusted persons and organizations, and would like a mechanism to authenticate such users before allowing them access to the organization's network. Furthermore, since information is transmitted from the organization's private, secure, and trusted network into a public or third-party network, organizations providing such access would benefit from having this information encrypted to prevent disclosure valuable information to others. One approach to solving this problem is to create a VPN (Virtual Private Network), such as an IPSec, PPTP, or L2TP network (referred to generally as “IPSec VPNs”). IPSec VPNs provide network-to-network communication, a “desk-like” work experience for the remote user, and are protocol independent, that is, they function at the network level rather than at the transport level. Unfortunately, VPNs do not work typically through firewalls. Traveling users, therefore, cannot connect back to their corporate resources while behind a firewall at a customer or partner site. Further, IPSec VPNs are difficult to deploy, maintain, and manage because they require intensive support and configuration, primarily due to installation and update of VPN clients on multiple machines. Typically, when deploying VPN client applications on client computers, administrators install the software interfaces on each client computer. Installation of these software interfaces usually requires administrative privileges on the client computer and may require physical access to the client computer. Such installations may be cumbersome for an information technology administrative staff to manage and deploy. A further drawback associated with IPSec VPNs is the exposure of client-side IP addresses to the accessed network, which has contributed to IPSec VPNs becoming a prime traversal route for the spread of worms, since secured clients obtain a routable IP address on the private network. Another approach to solving this problem, which was developed attempting to solve the issues associated with IPSec VPNs while providing secure access to remote workers and business partners, is an SSL VPN. SSL VPNs primarily operate with web applications over an HTTPS connection. SSL VPNs parse web pages at runtime to ensure that every web navigation path is routable from the client computer. Since SSL VPNs provide a clientless way to access applications that are internal to an enterprise or organization network, they are easier to deploy and reduce the support issues of IPSec VPNs. Further, SSL VPNs do not expose client-side IP addresses to the accessed network. However, there are many drawbacks associated with using SSL VPNs, including lack of client-server application support without custom connectors, the inability to work with business applications that use binary object technology such as Java applets and ActiveX, and the inability to work with peer-to-peer applications such as soft-phones. Attempting to deploy both types of solutions and use each type for different circumstances has met with limited success because the inherent problems of each technology remain present in the combined solution. What is needed is a solution that has the combined advantages of both IPSec VPNs and SSL VPNs, but none of the shortcomings. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides the combined advantages of IPSec VPNs (network layer access control) and SSL VPNs (application layer access control), drastically improving end-user experience while significantly reducing the IT security administrator's support overhead and security risks. The present invention is appropriate for (i) employees remotely accessing an organization's network, (ii) B2B access and transactions, and (iii) intranet access from restricted LANs, such as wireless networks because remote network-level access to an organization's network and applications is provided securely over SSL/TLS. The present invention also relieves enterprises and organizations from the burden of maintaining two separate VPN infrastructures. The gateway device of the present invention performs authentication, termination of encrypted sessions, permission-based access control, and data traffic relaying. In one aspect, the present invention exposes a secure web URL, which is accessible after a user has authenticated to system. A per-session remote process is transmitted to the user's computing service. The remote process resides in the memory of the user's computing device until the session ends. The remote process is launched, and function as a lightweight packet concentrator, i.e., the remote process maps application connections using a reverse network address translation (NAT) table. During the session, the remote process operates at network layer 2 (between Ethernet and IP), encrypting all network traffic destined for the organization's network and forwards packets over an HTTPS session to the gateway, together with user credentials. All data traffic, therefore, is encrypted independent of port, i.e., potentially any port may be used to transmit encrypted data, not just port 443 . The gateway can also handle real-time traffic, such as voice (RTP/SIP) with minimal loss in performance. The gateway may reside in an organization's DMZ with access to both the external network and internal network. Alternatively, the gateway can partition local area networks internally in the organization for access control and security between wired/wireless and data/voice networks. In one aspect, the invention relates to a device for routing packets including a receiver, a filter, and a transmitter. The receiver intercepts from a data link layer a packet in a first plurality of packets destined for a first system on a private network. The filter intercepts from the data link layer a packet in a second plurality of packets transmitted from a second system on the private network, destined for a system on a second network. The transmitter in communication with the receiver and the filter performs a network address translation on at least one intercepted packet and transmits the at least one intercepted packet to a destination. In one embodiment, the device includes an addressing element associating a private IP address with a system having a public IP address. In another embodiment, the device includes a policy engine, in communication with the filter and the receiver, applying policy to an intercepted packet. In still another embodiment, the transmitter transmits the at least one intercepted packet across a communications tunnel to the system on the second network. In yet another embodiment, the transmitter performs a reverse network address translation on the at least one intercepted packet. In some embodiments, the transmitter transmits a remote process to the system on the second network. In another aspect, the invention relates to a method of routing packets, including the step of intercepting from a data link layer a packet in a first plurality of packets destined for a first system on a private network. A packet in a second plurality of packets transmitted from a second system on the private network and destined for a system on a second network is intercepted from the data link layer. A network address translation (NAT) is performed on at least one intercepted packet. The at least one intercepted packet is transmitted to a destination. In one embodiment, the method includes the step of associating a private IP address with a system having a public IP address. In another embodiment, the method includes the step of applying policy to an intercepted packet. In still another embodiment, the method includes the step of transmitting the at least one intercepted packet across a communications tunnel to the system on the second network. In yet another embodiment, the method includes the step of performing a reverse network address translation on the at least one intercepted packet. In some embodiments, the method includes the step of transmitting a remote process to the system on the second network. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS These and other aspects of this invention will be readily apparent from the detailed description below and the appended drawings, which are meant to illustrate and not to limit the invention, and in which: FIG. 1 is a block diagram depicting a system in which client computing devices access a gateway computing device over a first network; FIG. 2A and 2B are block diagrams depicting embodiments of a computer useful in connection with the present invention; FIG. 3 is a flow diagram depicting one embodiment of the steps taken to establish a secure connection between a client computing device and a gateway computing device; FIG. 4 is a flow diagram depicting one embodiment of the steps taken in a method for routing packets from a client computing device to a gateway; FIG. 5 is a block diagram depicting one embodiment of a system for routing a packet from a client computing device to a gateway; FIG. 6 is a block diagram depicting one embodiment of a client application transmitting a packet to a gateway responsive to applying a policy to the packet; FIG. 7 is a block diagram depicting one embodiment of a filter intercepting a packet and transmitting the packet responsive to a filtering table; FIG. 8 is a flow diagram depicting one embodiment of the steps taken in a method for routing packets from a peripheral device to a virtual private network gateway; FIG. 9 is a block diagram depicting one embodiment of a system for routing packets to a gateway; FIG. 10 is a flow diagram depicting one embodiment of the steps taken in a method for routing packets from a gateway to a client computing device; and FIG. 11 is a block diagram depicting one embodiment of a gateway. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring now to FIG. 1 , a block diagram of a system is shown in which client computing devices 110 access a gateway computing device 120 over a first network 150 . In some embodiments, the client computing devices 110 access the gateway computing device 120 through a firewall 130 , shown in phantom view. In turn, the gateway computing device 120 communicates with target computing devices 140 over a second network 180 . Although FIG. 1 shows only one gateway computing device 120 and one type of each of the client computing devices 110 and target computing devices 140 , it should be understood that any number of those devices may be present. As shown in FIG. 1 , a client computing device 110 may include a personal computer 112 , a computing kiosk 114 , a personal digital assistant (PDA) 116 or cell phone 118 . In some embodiments, a computing kiosk 114 is a personal computer that had been configure to allow access by multiple users, typically in a public location and usually for a fee. FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B depict block diagrams of a typical computer 200 useful for embodiments in which the client computing device 110 is a personal computer 112 and embodiments in which the kiosk computing device 114 is provided as a personal computer a personal computer, of the sort manufactured by the Hewlett-Packard Corporation of Palo Alto, Calif. or the Dell Corporation of Round Rock, Tex. As shown in FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B , each computer 200 includes a central processing unit 202 , and a main memory unit 204 . Each computer 200 may also include other optional elements, such as one or more input/output devices 230 a - 230 n (generally referred to using reference numeral 230 ), and a cache memory 240 in communication with the central processing unit 202 . The central processing unit 202 is any logic circuitry that responds to and processes instructions fetched from the main memory unit 204 . In many embodiments, the central processing unit is provided by a microprocessor unit, such as: the 8088, the 80286, the 80386, the 80486, the Pentium, Pentium Pro, the Pentium II, the Celeron, or the Xeon processor, all of which are manufactured by Intel Corporation of Mountain View, Calif.; the 68000, the 68010, the 68020, the 68030, the 68040, the PowerPC 601, the PowerPC604, the PowerPC604e, the MPC603e, the MPC603ei, the MPC603ev, the MPC603r, the MPC603p, the MPC740, the MPC745, the MPC750, the MPC755, the MPC7400, the MPC7410, the MPC7441, the MPC7445, the MPC7447, the MPC7450, the MPC7451, the MPC7455, the MPC7457 processor, all of which are manufactured by Motorola Corporation of Schaumburg, Ill.; the Crusoe TM5800, the Crusoe TM5600, the Crusoe TM5500, the Crusoe TM5400, the Efficeon TM8600, the Efficeon TM8300, or the Efficeon TM8620 processor, manufactured by Transmeta Corporation of Santa Clara, Calif.; the RS/6000 processor, the RS64, the RS 64 II, the P2SC, the POWER3, the RS64 III, the POWER3-II, the RS 64 IV, the POWER4, the POWER4+, the POWER5, or the POWER6 processor, all of which are manufactured by International Business Machines of White Plains, N.Y.; or the AMD Opteron, the AMD Athlon 64 FX, the AMD Athlon, or the AMD Duron processor, manufactured by Advanced Micro Devices of Sunnyvale, Calif. Main memory unit 204 may be one or more memory chips capable of storing data and allowing any storage location to be directly accessed by the microprocessor 202 , such as Static random access memory (SRAM), Burst SRAM or SynchBurst SRAM (BSRAM), Dynamic random access memory (DRAM), Fast Page Mode DRAM (FPM DRAM), Enhanced DRAM (EDRAM), Extended Data Output RAM (EDO RAM), Extended Data Output DRAM (EDO DRAM), Burst Extended Data Output DRAM (BEDO DRAM), Enhanced DRAM (EDRAM), synchronous DRAM (SDRAM), JEDEC SRAM, PC100 SDRAM, Double Data Rate SDRAM (DDR SDRAM), Enhanced SDRAM (ESDRAM), SyncLink DRAM (SLDRAM), Direct Rambus DRAM (DRDRAM), or Ferroelectric RAM (FRAM). In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2A , the processor 202 communicates with main memory 204 via a system bus 220 (described in more detail below). FIG. 2B depicts an embodiment of a computer 200 in which the processor communicates directly with main memory 204 via a memory port. For example, in FIG. 2B , the main memory 204 may be DRDRAM. FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B depict embodiments in which the main processor 202 communicates directly with cache memory 240 via a secondary bus, sometimes referred to as a “backside” bus. In other embodiments, the main processor 202 communicates with cache memory 240 using the system bus 220 . Cache memory 240 typically has a faster response time than main memory 204 and is typically provided by SRAM, BSRAM, or EDRAM. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 2A , the processor 202 communicates with various I/O devices 230 via a local system bus 220 . Various buses may be used to connect the central processing unit 202 to the I/O devices 230 , including a VESA VL bus, an ISA bus, an EISA bus, a MicroChannel Architecture (MCA) bus, a PCI bus, a PCI-X bus, a PCI-Express bus, or a NuBus. For embodiments in which the I/O device is a video display, the processor 202 may use an Advanced Graphics Port (AGP) to communicate with the display. FIG. 2B depicts an embodiment of a computer 200 in which the main processor 202 communicates directly with I/O device 230 b via HyperTransport, Rapid I/O, or InfiniBand. FIG. 2B also depicts an embodiment in which local busses and direct communication are mixed: the processor 202 communicates with I/O device 230 a using a local interconnect bus while communicating with I/O device 130 b directly. A wide variety of I/O devices 230 may be present in the computer 200 . Input devices include keyboards, mice, trackpads, trackballs, microphones, and drawing tablets. Output devices include video displays, speakers, inkjet printers, laser printers, and dye-sublimation printers. In further embodiments, an I/O device 230 may be a bridge between the system bus 120 and an external communication bus, such as a USB bus, an Apple Desktop Bus, an RS-232 serial connection, a SCSI bus, a FireWire bus, a FireWire 800 bus, an Ethernet bus, an AppleTalk bus, a Gigabit Ethernet bus, an Asynchronous Transfer Mode bus, a HIPPI bus, a Super HIPPI bus, a SerialPlus bus, a SCI/LAMP bus, a FibreChannel bus, or a Serial Attached small computer system interface bus. General-purpose desktop computers of the sort depicted in FIG. 2A and FIG. 2B typically operate under the control of operating systems, which control scheduling of tasks and access to system resources. Typical operating systems include: MICROSOFT WINDOWS, manufactured by Microsoft Corp. of Redmond, Wash.; MacOS, manufactured by Apple Computer of Cupertino, Calif.; OS/2, manufactured by International Business Machines of Armonk, N.Y.; and Linux, a freely-available operating system distributed by Caldera Corp. of Salt Lake City, Utah, among others. A computer 200 may also be any personal computer (e.g., 286-based, 386-based, 486-based, Pentium-based, Pentium II-based, Pentium III-based, Pentium 4-based, Pentium M-based, or Macintosh computer), Windows-based terminal, Network Computer, wireless device, information appliance, RISC Power PC, X-device, workstation, mini computer, main frame computer, personal digital assistant, or other computing device. Windows-oriented platforms supported by the computer 200 can include, without limitation, WINDOWS 3.x, WINDOWS 95, WINDOWS 98, WINDOWS NT 3.51, WINDOWS NT 4.0, WINDOWS 2000, WINDOWS CE, WINDOWS ME, WINDOWS XP, WINDOWS Longhorn, MAC/OS, Java, and UNIX. The computer 200 can include a visual display device (e.g., a computer monitor), a data entry device (e.g., a keyboard), persistent or volatile storage (e.g., computer memory) for storing downloaded application programs, a processor, and a mouse. Execution of a communication program allows the system 200 to participate in a distributed computer system model. For embodiments in which the client computing device 110 is a mobile device, the device may be a JAVA-enabled cellular telephone, such as the i55sr, i58sr, i85s, or the i88s, all of which are manufactured by Motorola Corp. of Schaumburg, Ill.; the 6035 or the 7135, manufactured by Kyocera of Kyoto, Japan; or the i300 or i330, manufactured by Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., of Seoul, Korea. A typical mobile device may comprise many of the elements described in FIG. 2A and 2B , including the processor 202 and the main memory 204 . In other embodiments in which the client computing device 110 is mobile, it may be a personal digital assistant (PDA) operating under control of the PalmOS operating system, such as the Tungsten W, the VII, the VIIx, the i705, all of which are manufactured by palmOne, Inc. of Milpitas, Calif. In further embodiments, the computer 100 may be a personal digital assistant (PDA) operating under control of the PocketPC operating system, such as the iPAQ 4155, iPAQ 5555, iPAQ 1945, iPAQ 2215, and iPAQ 4255, all of which manufactured by Hewlett-Packard Corporation of Palo Alto, Calif.; the ViewSonic V36, manufactured by ViewSonic of Walnut, Calif.; or the Toshiba PocketPC e405, manufactured by Toshiba America, Inc. of New York, N.Y. In still other embodiments, the computer 100 is a combination PDA/telephone device such as the Treo 180, Treo 270, Treo 600, or the Treo 650, all of which are manufactured by palmOne, Inc. of Milpitas, Calif. In still further embodiments, the client computing device 110 is a cellular telephone that operates under control of the PocketPC operating system, such as the MPx200, manufactured by Motorola Corp. A typical combination PDA/telephone device may comprise many of the elements described in FIG. 2A and 2B , including the processor 202 and the main memory 204 . Referring back to FIG. 1 , the gateway computing device 120 may be a computer such as those described above. In some embodiments, the gateway computing device is physically configured as a blade server or a multi-processor computer server. In still other embodiments, the gateway computing device may be a virtualized server operating one processor of a multi-processor system. Client computing devices 110 communicate with the gateway computing device 120 over a first network 150 . In some embodiments, client computing devices 110 communicate over a network connection. The network can be a local area network (LAN), a metropolitan area network (MAN), or a wide area network (WAN) such as the Internet. The client computing devices 110 and the gateway computing device 120 may connect to a network through a variety of connections including standard telephone lines, LAN or WAN links (e.g., T1, T3, 56 kb, X.25), broadband connections (ISDN, Frame Relay, ATM), and wireless connections. Connections between the client computing devices 110 and the gateway computing device 120 may use a variety of data-link layer communication protocols (e.g., TCP/IP, IPX, SPX, NetBIOS, NetBEUI, SMB, Ethernet, ARCNET, Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI), RS232, IEEE 802.11,IEEE 802.11a, IEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11g and direct asynchronous connections). Still referring to FIG. 1 , target computing systems 140 may include file servers 142 , thin-client application servers 144 , media servers 146 , IP telephone applications 148 , and servers 149 providing traditional, “fat-client” client-sever applications for execution. The gateway computing device 120 communicates with the target computing devices 140 via a second network 180 . The second network 180 may use any of protocols and transport mechanisms described above in connection with the first network 150 . Referring now to FIG. 3 , one embodiment of the steps taken to establish a secure connection between a client computing device 110 and a gateway computing device 120 is shown. In brief overview, the client computing device 110 accesses the gateway computing device URL (step 302 ). The gateway computing device 120 authenticates the user of the client computing device 110 (step 304 ) and transmits a portal page to the client computing device 110 for display to the user (step 306 ). The client computing device 110 transmits a request to connect to the gateway computing device 120 (step 308 ). The gateway computing device 120 transmits a remote process to the client computing device 110 (step 310 ). The client computing device 110 launches the remote process (step 312 ). Once launched, the remote process establishes a secure communication tunnel to the gateway computing device 120 (step 314 ). Still referring to FIG. 3 , and now in greater detail, the client computing device 110 accesses the gateway computing device URL (step 302 ). In some embodiments, the gateway computing device URL is a public URL accessible to any browser application. The gateway computing device 120 responds to the request for the gateway computing device URL by transmitting a page to the client computing device 110 prompting the user of the client computing device for authentication information. The gateway computing device 120 authenticates the user of the client computing device 110 (step 304 ). In some embodiments, the gateway computing device 120 prompts the user for authentication credentials using HTTP 401 Basic, Digest, or NTLM. Once credentials are received from the user, authentication may occur using LDAP, RADIUS, two-factor authentication techniques, authentication certificates, or biometric techniques. For example, the user may authenticate using token-based, two-factor authentication techniques such SecurID tokens, manufactured and sold by RSA Security Inc. of Bedford, Mass. or SafeWord tokens manufactured by Secure Computing of San Jose, Calif. The gateway computing device 120 transmits a portal page to the client computing device 110 for display to the user (step 306 ). In some embodiments, the portal page requests additional information from the user, such as the user's location, the capabilities of the client computing device 110 , or whether the user owns the client computing device 110 . In other embodiments, the portal page allows the user to specify particular network resources to which the user wants access. In still other embodiments, the portal page provides a button for the user to select to establish the connection. The client computing device 110 transmits a request to connect to the gateway device 120 (step 308 ). In one embodiment, the client computing device 110 automatically transmits the request upon selection by a user of a network resource to access. In other embodiments, the client computing device 110 automatically transmits the request after the user submits information requested by the portal page. The gateway computing device 120 transmits remote process to the client computing device 110 (step 310 ). In one embodiment, the remote process comprises a client application. The client application may comprise functionality for receiving a packet, applying a policy to the packet, and determining to transmit the packet to the gateway computing device 110 . In some embodiments, the remote process comprises a driver. The driver may comprise functionality for capturing a packet and determining to forward the packet to the client application, responsive to a filter table received from the client application. In one of these embodiments, the remote process comprises a driver constructed in compliance with the Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS). In another of these embodiments, the driver comprises a mini-filter. In still another of these embodiments, the driver executes in kernel space on the client computing device 110 . In yet another of these embodiments, the driver executes in application space on the client computing device 110 . In still another of these embodiments, the driver is transmitted to the client computing device 120 separately from the remote process. In yet another of these embodiments, the gateway computing device 120 determines that the client computing device 110 already comprises an NDIS driver and that transmission of an NDIS driver to the client computing device 110 is not required. The client computing device 110 launches the remote process (step 312 ). The client computing device 110 may launch the remote process automatically, at the time of installation. In other embodiments, the client computing device 110 may launch the remote process automatically, at a time when the user of the client computing device 110 requests access to a target computing device 140 . In still other embodiments, a user of the client computing device 110 may launch the remote process automatically prior to requesting access to a target computing device 140 . Once launched, the remote process establishes a secure communication tunnel to the gateway computing device 120 (step 314 ). In embodiments where the remote process is a client application executing in application space, the client application establishes the secure communication tunnel to the gateway computing device 120 . In one embodiment, the secure communication tunnel is established over an HTTPS port, such as port 442 , or any other configured port on the gateway computing device 120 , using TLS or SSL encryption. In another embodiment, the secure communications tunnel may be established using industry standard connection establishment techniques, such as HTTPS, Proxy HTTPS, and SOCKS. Use of these techniques may enable use of the present invention in embodiments where a firewall 130 is implemented. In some embodiments, a connection is made via an intermediate proxy. In one of these embodiments, the client computing device 110 obtains from the user of the client computing device 110 credentials requested by the intermediate proxy. In some embodiments, the secure communication tunnel is encrypted using industry standard technology, such as SSL and TLS. Upon establishment of the secure communication tunnel, session payload is encrypted and captured IP packets may be securely transmitted to the gateway computing device 120 . Packets and packet header information transmitted across the secure communication tunnel are encrypted. The secure communication tunnel may support 196-bit encryption as well as higher or lower bit values. In one embodiment, the secure communication tunnel supports all OpenSSL ciphers, including CAST, CAST5, DES, Triple-DES, IDEA, RC2, RC4, and RC5. In some embodiments, the gateway computing device 120 transmits configuration information to the remote process. The configuration information may provide the remote process with descriptive information regarding a network being secured, such as the network 180 . The configuration information may also include IP addresses required to enable visibility of the client computing device 110 on one or more networks. The configuration information may further include information needed to validate that the remote process successfully established the communication tunnel. This information may enable the remote process to test and validate client-side certificates, directly or by configuring the client computing device 110 to do so. The information may also comprise authentication information enabling the remote process to validate that the tunnel is established. In some embodiments, upon the launch of the remote process, the remote process captures all network traffic destined for a private, secured network, such as the network 180 . In one of these embodiments, the remote process redirects captured network traffic over the established secure communications tunnel to the gateway computing device 120 . In an embodiment where all network traffic is captured and transmitted over a secure link, the present invention provides functionality equivalent to that provided by an IPSec solution. In one of these embodiments, a TCP connection is initiated by an application executing on the client computing device 110 , for transmission of IP packets to a target computing device 140 . The remote process captures the IP packets generated by the application. The remote process may send a TCP acknowledgement packet to the application and terminate the TCP connection initiated by the application. The remote process then creates a second TCP connection to the gateway computing device 120 and transmits the captured IP packets to the gateway computing device 120 across the secure communications tunnel. In some embodiments, the remote process may store a captured IP packet in a buffer. In these embodiments, the remote process may transmit the stored IP packet to the gateway computing device 120 . Storing the captured IP packets in a buffer enables preservation of the packets in the event of a disruption in the secure communications tunnel between the gateway computing device 120 and the client computing device 110 . In another of these embodiments, upon receipt of the captured IP packets, the gateway computing device 120 may create a third TCP connection between the gateway computing device 120 to the target computing device 140 . The gateway computing device 120 may maintain a port-mapped Network Address Translation (NAT) table, enabling the gateway computing device 120 to transmit response packets from the target computing device 140 to the port monitored by the application that originally generated the IP packet on the client computing device 110 . Because the client computing device 110 communicates only with a public network address of the gateway computing device 120 , the client computing device 110 is unaware of the network address of the target computing device 140 , increasing security to the network on which the target computing device 140 resides. Similarly, since the gateway computing device 120 originates the TCP connection to the target computing device 140 , the target computing device 140 does not receive the address information of the client computing device 110 , protecting the client computing device and the network on which it resides. Additionally, since the gateway computing device 120 receives the IP packets, the gateway computing device 120 may make a determination responsive to a policy or security check as to whether or not to transmit the IP packets to the target computing device 140 , further increasing protection to the network on which the target computing device 140 resides. In some embodiments, functionality is required that enables the gateway computing device 120 to create a connection to the client computing device 110 . The functionality may be required to enable the client computing device 110 to use protocols such as those required by real-time voice applications. In one of these embodiments, the remote process associates the client computing device 110 with a network address on the network 180 . In another of these embodiments, a remote process execution on the gateway computing device 120 associates the client computing device 110 with the network address on the network 180 . In other embodiments, a remote process execution on the gateway computing device 120 maintains a reverse NAT table. In one embodiment, the present invention provides a method for securing a packet transmitted from a private, secured network 180 behind a gateway 120 to a client computing device 110 on an external network 150 . The invention enables separation of the client computing device from the private network by providing network address translation (NAT) functionality on the gateway. A VPN gateway that uses NAT provides masquerading of IP addresses of a client computing device to shield the private network from direct layer-2 access by the client computing device. Referring now to FIG. 4 , a flow diagram depicts one embodiment of the steps taken in a method for routing packets from a client computing device to a gateway computing device. In brief overview, a filtering table is received (step 402 ). An outbound packet is intercepted (step 404 ). The outbound packet is transmitted to a client application, responsive to the filtering table (step 406 ). The client application transmits the outbound packet to a gateway computing device, responsive to an application of a policy to the outbound packet (step 408 ). A filtering table is received (step 402 ). In some embodiments, the filtering table includes information about a private network. In other embodiments, a filter on a client computing device receives the filtering table. In one of these embodiments, the filter receives the filtering table from a client application on the client computing device. In another of these embodiments, the filter receives configuration settings from the client application and stores the configuration settings in a filtering table. An outbound packet is intercepted (step 404 ). In some embodiments, a filter on a client computing device intercepts the outbound packet. In one of these embodiments, the filter intercepts all outbound packets. In another of these embodiments, the filter inspects an intercepted outbound packet. In still another of these embodiments, the filter inspects an intercepted outbound packet prior to the outbound packet being routed. In another embodiment, the filter inspects an intercepted outbound packet prior to the outbound packet reaching the data link layer in which the outbound packet would be prepared for routing. The outbound packet is transmitted to a client application responsive to the filtering table (step 406 ). In some embodiments, a filter transmits the outbound packet to the client application, responsive to the filtering table. In one of these embodiments, when the filter inspects an outbound packet, the filter compares data in the outbound packet to data in the filtering table. In one embodiment, the filtering table indicates that an outbound packet should be transmitted to the client application if the outbound packet is addressed to a particular destination, such as a private network behind a gateway computing device. In another embodiment, the filtering table indicates that an outbound packet should be transmitted to the client application if the outbound packet is a particular type of packet, for example, a packet containing real-time data, such as voice or video data. In still another embodiment, the filtering table indicates that a packet should be transmitted to the client application if transmission of the outbound packet requires a particular protocol type. In one embodiment, the filter transmits the outbound packet to the client application responsive to a routing table. In another embodiment, the filter transmits the outbound packet to a port monitored by the client application. In some embodiments, the filter rewrites a destination address and a destination port of the packet. In one of these embodiments, the filter transmits the rewritten packet back up the network stack of the operating system for delivery to the client application. In another of these embodiments, the filter transmits information about the outbound packet to the client application prior to rewriting the destination address and destination port. The transmitted information may include the original destination address and destination port. The client application determines to transmit the outbound packet to a gateway computing device, responsive to an application of a policy to the outbound packet (step 408 ). In one embodiment, the filtering table indicates to the filter that the outbound packet should be transmitted to the client application. In some embodiments, upon receipt of the outbound packet from the filter, the client application applies a policy to the outbound packet. In one of these embodiments, the client application determines whether to transmit the outbound packet to the gateway computing device responsive to the application of the policy. In one embodiment, the determination to transmit the outbound packet to the gateway computing device is based upon the type of application that generated the outbound packet. In another embodiment, the determination to transmit the outbound packet to the gateway computing device is based upon the type of data within the outbound packet. In still another embodiment, the determination to transmit the outbound packet to the gateway computing device is based upon a characteristic of a destination network to which the outbound packet is addressed. In one embodiment, the client application authenticates the client computing device to a gateway computing device prior to transmission of the outbound packet. In another embodiment, the client application encrypts the outbound packet prior to transmitting the outbound packet to the gateway computing device. In still another embodiment, the client application establishes a secure sockets layer (SSL) tunnel to the gateway computing device. In yet another embodiment, the client application transmits an encrypted outbound packet to the gateway computing device via an SSL tunnel to the gateway computing device. Referring now to FIG. 5 , a block diagram depicts one embodiment of a system for routing a packet from a client computing device to a gateway computing device. In brief overview, the system includes a client computing device 520 and a gateway computing device 540 . The client computing device 520 includes an application space 532 and a kernel 534 . The application space 532 includes a client application 526 . The kernel space 534 includes a filter 522 and a packet 528 . In one embodiment, the filter 522 and the client application 526 form a device for routing packets to a gateway computing device. The kernel 534 may include a filter 522 and an outbound packet 528 . The filter 522 may include a packet capture module 565 . The packet capture module 565 may comply with the Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS). The packet capture module 565 may operate in kernel mode. The packet capture module 565 may intercept outbound packet traffic. The packet capture module 565 may forward the packets to a frame monitor in an application 526 . In some embodiments, the filter 522 communicates with the client application 526 via asynchronous I/O control messages. In one of these embodiments, the packet capture module 565 may forward packets addressed to a private network behind a gateway computing device 540 via asynchronous I/O control messages. In other embodiments, the filter 522 communicates with the client application 526 running in the application space 534 via UDP packets. In one embodiment, the filter 522 receives configuration settings from the client application 526 driver via asynchronous I/O control messages. The configuration settings may include information regarding which networks, protocols, or types of packets to filter. In one embodiment, the filter 522 stores the configuration settings in a filtering table. In another embodiment, the filter 522 receives a filtering table including the configuration settings. In one embodiment, the filter 522 intercepts all outbound packets 528 for inspection. If the packet 528 satisfies a condition listed in the filtering table, the filter 522 may transmit the packet 528 to the client application 526 and not to the original destination of the packet 528 . The filter 522 may use an asynchronous I/O control message to forward the packet 528 to the client application 526 . The filter 522 may transmit the packet 528 to the client application 526 responsive to a routing table. The kernel 534 in the client computing device 520 may include an NDIS interface. In some embodiments, the NDIS interface includes a plurality of intermediate filters. In one embodiment, a packet 528 passes through the NDIS interface and may be inspected by the plurality of intermediate filters. The filter 522 may be provided as an NDIS driver. The filter 522 may also be a process executing on the kernel 534 . The application space 532 includes a client application 526 . In one embodiment, the application space 532 may include an application 538 , which may generate the packet 528 . In some embodiments, an application 538 executing in application space 532 generates a packet 528 for transmission by the client computing device 520 . The application 538 can be any type and/or form of application such as any type and/or form of web browser, web-based client, client-server application, a thin-client computing client, an ActiveX control, or a Java applet, or any other type and/or form of executable instructions capable of executing on client computing device 110 or communicating via a network. The application 538 can use any type of protocol and it can be, for example, an HTTP client, an FTP client, an Oscar client, or a Telnet client. In some embodiments, the application 538 uses a remote display or presentation level protocol. In one embodiment, the application 538 is an ICA client, developed by Citrix Systems, Inc. of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. In other embodiments, the application 538 includes a Remote Desktop (RDP) client, developed by Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Washington. In other embodiments, the application 538 comprises any type of software related to Voice over IP (VOIP) communications, such as a soft IP telephone. In further embodiments, the application 538 comprises any application related to real-time data communications, such as applications for streaming video and/or audio. The client application 526 may reside in application space 532 on a client computing device 520 . In some embodiments, the client application 526 provides functionality for receiving packets from the filter 522 . In other embodiments, the client application 526 provides functionality for applying a policy to a received packet 528 . In still other embodiments, the client application 526 provides functionality for managing an SSL tunnel to the gateway computing device 540 . In yet other embodiments, the client application 526 provides functionality for encrypting and transmitting a packet 528 to the gateway computing device 540 . The client application 526 may include frame monitor 560 . The frame monitor 560 may include policies and logic for applying a policy to a received packet. The frame monitor 560 may apply a policy to a received packet 528 . The client application 526 may transmit a packet to a gateway computing device 540 responsive to a policy-based determination made by the frame monitor 560 . In some embodiments, the frame monitor 560 may apply a policy to determine a state of the client computing device 520 at the time of transmission of the packet. In some embodiments, the policy applied may require satisfaction of a condition. In one of these embodiments, the policy may require that the client computing device 520 execute a particular operating system to satisfy the condition. In some embodiments, a policy may require that the client computing device 520 execute a particular operating system patch to satisfy the condition. In still other embodiments, a policy may require that the client computing device 520 provide a MAC address for each installed network card to satisfy the condition. In some embodiments, a policy may require that the client computing device 520 indicate membership in a particular Active Directory to satisfy the condition. In another embodiment, a policy may require that the client computing device 520 execute a virus scanner to satisfy the condition. In other embodiments, a policy may require that the client computing device 520 execute a personal firewall to satisfy the condition. In some embodiments, a policy may require that the client computing device 520 comprise a particular device type to satisfy the condition. In other embodiments, a policy may require that the client computing device 520 establish a particular type of network connection to satisfy the condition. In other embodiments, the frame monitor 560 may identify an application 538 that generated the packet 528 . In one of these embodiments, the frame monitor 560 may make a policy-based determination to transmit the packet 528 to the gateway computing device 540 responsive to the identified application 538 . In another of these embodiments, the frame monitor 560 may perform a checksum on the packet to verify that the identified application actually generated the packet 528 . In one embodiment, the gateway computing device 540 is a remote access server. The gateway computing device 540 may decrypt packets received from the client computing device 520 . The gateway computing device 540 may protect a private network. In some embodiments, the gateway computing device 540 associates a client computing device 520 with a private IP address. In one of these embodiments, when the gateway computing device 540 receives a packet from the client computing device 520 , the gateway computing device 540 transforms the IP address of the packet to the IP address associated with the client computing device 520 . The gateway computing device 540 may apply access control policies to a received packet prior to routing the packet to a final destination. The gateway computing device 540 is described in further detail below, in FIG. 11 . Once a frame enters the gateway computing device 540 via an SSL tunnel, the packet and its payload are dispatched via callbacks into a handlers executing in user mode, which provide functionality for SSL decryption. In one embodiment, OpenSSL is used. In another embodiment, a hardware accelerator is used. Once the packet is decrypted, it is injected into the HTTP stack where headers are assembled and passed on to the remote access blade. In a remote access blade, a packet is classified by the type of data contained within the packet. In one embodiment, the packet contains an HTTP header requesting login and registration. In another embodiment, the packet seeks TCP/UDP/RAW/OTHER connection establishment. In still another embodiment, the packet contains connection-specific data. In yet another embodiment, the packet contains a special feature request such as collaboration with other users, fetching of user directory and presence or requesting telephony functionality such as conferencing and web cast. The remote access module dispatches the packet appropriately to the corresponding sub handler. For example, the client computing device may request that a connection be set up to a specific machine on the private network behind the gateway computing device. The remote access module may consult with the access control module and if a positive response is returned, the remote access module may grant the request. In some embodiments, the remote access module may grant the request by injecting subsequent frames on the private network using a frame forwarding module utilizing NAT/PAT to correlate incoming frames to corresponding SSL tunnels to the client computing device. Referring now to FIG. 6 , a block diagram depicts one embodiment of a client application transmitting a packet to a gateway computing device responsive to applying a policy to the packet. The client application 526 in application space 532 receives a packet. In one embodiment, the client application 526 receives the packet from the filter 522 . In some embodiments, an interface 602 on the client application 526 receives the packet. In one of these embodiments, the interface 602 is a full-duplex direct I/O-based IRP-handling interface with an I/O Control Windows Management Interface (WMI). The client application 526 inspects the packet. In one embodiment, a policy and host security engine API 620 on the client application 526 inspects the packet. In one embodiment, the policy and host security engine API 620 applies a policy to the packet. The policy may include requirements for hosts and processes accessing a corporate network. In some embodiments, the policy and host security engine API 620 identifies an application 538 that generated the packet. An application 538 may be continuously check-summed to ensure that malicious applications with the same name did not generate the packet. If the policy and host security engine API 620 determines that the current condition and history of the machine satisfies the applied policies, the client application 526 may transmit the packet to the gateway computing device 540 . In some embodiments, a packet/frame forwarding and SSL tunnel management API 610 on the client application 326 transmits the packet to a gateway computing device 540 . The API 610 may transmit the packet across an SSL tunnel to the gateway computing device 540 . In one embodiment, the client application 526 establishes an asynchronous maintenance tunnel to communicate with a policy module on the gateway computing device 540 . The client application 526 may use the tunnel to communicate with the gateway computing device 540 regarding client events (such as status of firewalls and anti-virus programs). The client application 526 may also use the tunnel to receive new policies from the gateway computing device. In some embodiments, the client application 526 includes an Application Hook and TDI analysis API 630 . The API 530 may use Windows menu hooking and tray pop hooking to inject GUI messages to an end user of the client computing device 520 . In one embodiment, the GUI messages alert the end user of various system events, system administrator announcements and gather user credentials. In other embodiments, the client application 526 includes an audio/video and messaging integration API 640 . The API 640 may use audio, video and IM messaging hooks to interconnect with existing user applications (such as MSN messenger or an installed softphone). Referring now to FIG. 7 , a block diagram depicts one embodiment of a filter 522 . In one embodiment, the filter 522 includes a protocol edge driver 710 and a miniport edge 720 . The protocol edge driver 710 exposes a protocol layer to the underlying network drivers. The miniport edge 720 exposes a miniport interface to the upper layer protocol drivers. Packets entering the protocol edge driver 710 on the receive path are arriving from other client computing devices that are using the client computing device 520 as a gateway computing device. Packets entering the miniport edge 720 are arriving from applications 538 running on the client computing device 520 that are transmitting outbound packets to a private network behind a gateway computing device 540 . The I/O filter 712 applies filtering logic on each packet and compares it against its filter table. If the I/O filter 712 filters the packet, the I/O filter 712 passes the packet to the IOCTL dispatch engine 714 with a request to forward the packet to the client application 526 . Otherwise, the I/O filter 712 sends the packet to its original direction, either up or down the network stack as appropriate. In some embodiments, the client application 326 is not located on the client computing device 320 . In one of these embodiments, a peripheral device contains the client application 326 . Referring now to FIG. 8 , a flow diagram depicts one embodiment of the steps taken in a method for routing packets from a peripheral device to a gateway computing device. In brief overview, the method includes the step of implementing, by a peripheral device, a change to a routing table (step 802 ). The peripheral device receives an outbound packet (step 804 ). The peripheral device transmits information about the outbound packet to a client application residing on the peripheral device (step 806 ). The peripheral device replaces address information on the outbound packet with a destination address and destination port associated with the client application (step 808 ). The peripheral device transmits the modified outbound packet to the client application (step 810 ). Referring now to FIG. 8 , and in greater detail, a peripheral device implements a change to a routing table (step 802 ). In some embodiments, the peripheral device retrieves a plurality of changes to make to the routing table. In one of these embodiments, the peripheral device may retrieve the changes from a VPN gateway computing device. In another of these embodiments, the VPN gateway computing device may require authentication of the peripheral device prior to the retrieval of routing table changes. In one embodiment, the peripheral device stores a VPN application. Upon connection to a computer system, the peripheral device identifies itself to the client computing device as a mass storage device and executes the VPN application on the client computing device. In some embodiments, the VPN application authenticates the peripheral device to a VPN gateway computing device. In one of these embodiments, after authentication, the VPN application retrieves routing table changes from the VPN gateway computing device. In another of these embodiments, the VPN application creates a file on the peripheral device storing retrieved routing table changes. In still another of these embodiments, the VPN application retrieves data for use by the peripheral device. The data may include a destination address of the VPN gateway computing device, an IP address for the client computing device, and at least one port address for the VPN application to monitor. In some embodiments, upon creation of a file on the peripheral device, the peripheral device identifies itself to the client computing device as a network device. In one of these embodiments, the peripheral device transfers to the client computing device a plurality of routing table changes stored in the created file. In another of these embodiments, the peripheral device instructs a computer through the transmitted routing table changes to transmit an outbound packet to the peripheral device. In still another of these embodiments, the change to the routing table indicates to the client computing device that all outbound packets not destined for the VPN application should be transmitted to the peripheral device. In some embodiments, an outbound packet is transmitted by the client computing device to the peripheral device, responsive to the change to the routing table. The peripheral device receives an outbound packet (step 804 ). In one embodiment, the peripheral device receives the outbound packet responsive to the change made to the routing table. In one embodiment, the peripheral device receives the outbound packet by interacting with the peripheral side of R-NDIS, accepts the outbound packet, and indicates to R-NDIS that the packet has been delivered. In one embodiment, when the peripheral device receives the outbound packet, the outbound packet includes an IP header storing a set of address information. In some embodiments, the peripheral device determines that the set of address information is unique. In one of these embodiments, when the peripheral device receives a unique set of address information, the peripheral device maps the unique set of address information to a unique source port. The peripheral device may generate a random number to create the unique source port. The peripheral device may store, in memory, the mapping from the unique set of address information to the unique source port. In some embodiments, the peripheral device generates a second packet. In one of these embodiments, the peripheral device creates a data structure inside a control frame in a data section of the second packet. In another of these embodiments, the data structure includes the unique source port. In still another of these embodiments, the data structure stores an IP address of the client computing device. In yet another of these embodiments, the data structure stores one of a plurality of well-known destination ports monitored by the VPN application. In some embodiments, the data structure stores well-known destination ports and destination address retrieved from the VPN Gateway computing device. The peripheral device transmits information about the outbound packet to a client application (step 806 ). In some embodiments, the peripheral device transmits the generated second packet to a VPN application. In one of these embodiments, the generated second packet includes the IP address of the client computing device and a destination port monitored by the VPN application. Including this information in the generated second packet enables the peripheral device to transmit the generated second packet and have the generated second packet delivered to the VPN application on a port monitored by the VPN application. In another of these embodiments, the generated second packet includes the unique source port generated by the peripheral device. In still another of these embodiments, the peripheral device indicates to the client computing device that the generated second packet is a new received packet and transmits the second packet to the client computing device. The client computing device receives the second packet and delivers it to the VPN application. The peripheral device replaces address information on the outbound packet with a destination address and a destination port associated with the client application (step 808 ). Rewriting the address information enables the peripheral device to forward the outbound packet to a VPN application. In one embodiment, the peripheral device replaces the destination address on the outbound packet with the IP address of the client computing device on which the VPN application executes. In another embodiment, the peripheral device replaces the destination port on the outbound packet with a destination port monitored by the VPN application. In still another embodiment, the peripheral device replaces the source port on the outbound packet with the generated unique source port described above. The peripheral device transmits the modified outbound packet to the VPN application (step 810 ). In some embodiments, the peripheral device indicates to the client computing device that the modified outbound packet is a newly received packet. In one of these embodiments, the client computing device receives the modified outbound packet, identifies the destination port as a port monitored by the VPN application, and transmits the modified outbound packet to the VPN application. The peripheral device generates the second packet to provide the VPN application with the unique source port. Once the VPN application receives the unique source port, the VPN application may use the unique source port to identify an original destination address associated with other packets. In one embodiment, when the VPN application receives a new, modified outbound packet containing a source port, the VPN application uses the unique source port to retrieve the original destination address of the outbound packet from a mapping stored on the peripheral device. In some embodiments, the VPN application transmits the outbound packet to the VPN gateway computing device. In one of these embodiments, the VPN application encrypts the modified outbound packet. In another of these embodiments, the VPN application transmits the outbound packet to the VPN gateway computing device, responsive to the information received about the outbound packet from the peripheral device. In still another of these embodiments, the VPN application employs a received unique source port to retrieve from the peripheral device a destination port and destination address associated with the unmodified outbound packet. The VPN application may then transmit the retrieved address information with the modified outbound packet to the VPN gateway computing device. In some embodiments, the VPN application makes a connection to the original destination address and then transmits the packet to the destination. In one embodiment, the VPN application establishes an SSL tunnel to the VPN gateway computing device. The VPN application may transmit the outbound packet to the VPN gateway computing device across the SSL tunnel. In this embodiment, the VPN application may establish the SSL tunnel responsive to a destination address associated with the outbound packet received from the peripheral device. In some embodiments, the firmware on the device enables several types of functionality. In one of these embodiments, the firmware reports the type of device as a composite USB mass storage and network device combination device. In another of these embodiments, the firmware stores and launches applications. These applications may include, without limitation, encryption and tunnel management logic, end user applications (such as email or soft phones), end user identity (such as certificates or tokens), autorun.inf files so applications are automatically launched, and end user application data (such as email pst files). In yet another of these embodiments, the firmware implements an R-NDIS loop back such that outbound IP packets that are sent to the peripheral device are identified to the client computing device as inbound IP packets and sent back to the host operating system to a different port. By marking an outbound packet as an inbound packet, the peripheral device can send the packet to the VPN application and prevent the packet from leaving the computer unencrypted. Forcing a packet to the VPN application, which sends the packet to a VPN gateway computing device for transmission to the original destination of the packet, also ensures that the packet is transmitted to the original destination in a secure manner. In other embodiments, the firmware on the peripheral device implements token software such that unique tokens are generated on a timely basis in synchronization with the authenticating VPN gateway computing device. The peripheral device may establish an authentication tunnel with the VPN gateway computing device. The VPN gateway computing device can read tokens from a file stored in mass storage on the peripheral device. The host VPN tunnel logic may fetch the token and sent the token to the VPN gateway computing device as an authentication factor. Referring now to FIG. 9 , a block diagram depicts one embodiment of a system for routing packets to a gateway computing device, the system including a device 900 and a client computing device 920 . In brief overview, the device 900 includes a routing element 902 , a receiver 904 , a transmitter 906 , a packet rewriter 908 , a VPN application 910 , a port forwarder application 912 , and a storage element 914 . The client computing device 920 includes a kernel 932 , a routing table 930 , a packet 928 , a physical network interface card (NIC) 936 , and a remote-NDIS (R-NDIS) driver 938 . The client computing device 920 comprises a routing table 930 , a packet 928 , a physical NIC 936 , and a remote-NDIS driver 938 . In some embodiments, the client computing device 920 further comprises a device driver that enables communication between the client computing device 920 and the device 900 . In one of these embodiments, the device driver may comprise a Remote-NDIS driver for Universal Serial Bus (USB) device. In one embodiment, the device 900 connects to the physical NIC 936 on the client computing device 920 . The physical NIC 936 may be a USB card. In other embodiments, the physical NIC 936 is an external bus supporting high data transfer rates and complying with the IEEE 1394 standard, such as a Firewire card. In other embodiments, the physical NIC 936 is a small computer system interface (SCSI) card. Still referring to FIG. 9 , the device 900 , in communication with the client computing device 920 , comprises a routing element 902 , a receiver 904 , a transmitter 906 , a packet rewriter 908 , a VPN application 910 , and a storage element 914 . In one embodiment, the device 900 is a peripheral device. In some embodiments, the device 900 is a Universal Serial Bus composite device capable of functioning as a mass storage device and as a network device. In one of these embodiments, the device 900 functions as a mass storage device because the device 900 includes the storage element 914 . The storage element 914 may store applications to execute on the client computing device 920 , such as the VPN application 910 . In one embodiment of the present invention, the device 900 , which may be a USB peripheral device, operates as a composite USB device declaring itself as a device capable of mass storage. A reporting element 916 , shown in shadow in FIG. 9 , may be included on the device 900 and may identify the device 900 to the client computing device 920 as a mass storage device or as a network device by changing a removable media device setting, such as a flag contained within the SCSI Inquiry Data response to the SCSI Inquiry command. Bit 7 of byte 1 (indexed from 0) is the Removable Media Bit (RMB). A RMB set to zero indicates that the device is not a removable media device. A RMB of one indicates that the device is a removable media device. A mass storage section of the device 900 , such as a storage element 914 , may contain the files necessary for the host side of the remote access software to launch and run in the memory space of the host operating system without any installation on the client computing device 920 . The device 900 may deploy software using a file such as autorun.inf that identifies for an operating system on the client computing device 920 what launcher files to execute. In an embodiment where the device 900 has a composite nature, the device 900 may initially appear as a mass storage capable of removable media and use autostart.inf to launch a port forwarder application 912 on a VPN application 910 . The port forwarder application 912 may show a login dialog to a user of the client computing device 920 and collect user credentials. In one embodiment, the port forward application 912 may establish an SSL tunnel with the VPN gateway computing device 940 and present the VPN gateway computing device 940 with authentication credentials, certificates, or tokens, each of which may be read from the mass storage section on the device 900 . For packets that are destined for a network on which the VPN gateway computing device 940 resides, the device 900 generates a unique source port number and maps the unique source port number to a destination address on the packet 928 . The device 900 may then rewrite the packet 928 , addressing the packet 928 to the destination address of the client computing device 920 and to a port on the client computing device 920 monitored by the port forwarder application 912 , and including the unique source port number in the rewritten packet 928 . The device 900 may transmit the rewritten packet 928 to the client computing device 920 . The client computing device 920 transmits the rewritten packet 928 to the port monitored by the VPN application 910 . The device 900 may store applications, such as electronic mail applications, in the storage element 914 , for execution on the client computing device 920 . In some embodiments, the present invention enables sandboxing. In one of these embodiments, the device 900 hosts application data if the device 900 determines that mass storage on the client computing device 920 is not a safe asset for the storage of data generated and used during a VPN session. In another of these embodiments, the invention provides a mechanism enabling plugging a device 900 into any client computing device 920 and automatically having session data readily available. Additionally, storage of an application and execution data on a device 900 may prevent a user from leaving sensitive data on insecure client computing devices 920 . In other embodiments, if the device 900 determines that the client computing device 920 is insecure and should not receive access to the network on which the VPN gateway computing device 940 resides, the device 900 may serve as a platform for launching a remote frame buffer (or thin client) mode of operation to gain remote access. In one of these embodiments, the session state for the remote access can be saved on the device 900 and resumed from other locations. In still other embodiments, the device 900 may also serve as an audio device and provide soft phone functionality to the client computing device, where the telephony logic runs in the port forwarder application and the device simply serves as an I/O mechanism. The routing element 902 implements a change to the routing table 930 on the client computing device 920 . In one embodiment, the routing element 902 changes the routing table so that the client computing device 920 reroutes all outbound packets to the device 900 . In another embodiment, the routing element 902 implements the change by transmitting a retrieved change to the client computing device after a reporting element 916 , shown in shadow in FIG. 9 , identifies the device 900 as a network device to the client computing device 920 . In some embodiments, the routing element 902 retrieves a plurality of changes to make to the routing table 930 . In one of these embodiments, the routing element 902 may retrieve the changes from a VPN gateway computing device 940 . In another of these embodiments, the VPN application 910 may retrieve the changes from the VPN gateway computing device 940 . In still another of these embodiments, the VPN gateway computing device 940 may require authentication of the device 900 prior to the retrieval of routing table changes. In some embodiments, the routing element 902 retrieves the change from the storage element 914 . In one of these embodiments, the routing element 902 retrieves the change after the VPN application 910 has stored the change on the storage element 914 . In an embodiment where the device 900 includes a reporting element 916 , the reporting element 916 may communicate with the client computing device 920 to identify the device 900 to the client computing device 920 . In some embodiments, the reporting element 916 communicates with an R-NDIS driver 938 . In one embodiment, the reporting element 916 identifies the device 900 as a mass storage device. The reporting element 916 may make this identification when the device 900 is initially connected to the client computing device. In some embodiments, the reporting element 916 identifies the device 900 as a network device. In one of these embodiments, the reporting element 916 makes the identification after changes to the routing table 930 are retrieved and stored in the storage element 914 . In another of these embodiments, the routing element 902 transfers to the client computing device 920 the retrieved routing table changes after the reporting element 916 identifies the device 900 to the client computing device 920 as a network device. In still another of these embodiments, the client computing device 920 implements the routing table changes as if the device 900 were a conventional network device. The receiver 904 receives a packet from the client computing device 920 . In one embodiment, the receiver 904 receives the outbound packet responsive to the change made to the routing table 930 by the routing element 902 . The transmitter 906 , in communication with the receiver 904 and the packet rewriter 908 , transmits information about the outbound packet to the VPN application 910 . In one embodiment, the information comprises a unique source port generated by the packet rewriter 908 and associated with the outbound packet 920 . In another embodiment, the information comprises a mapping between the unique source port of the outbound packet and the destination address of the outbound packet. In still another embodiment, the transmitter 906 transmits a rewritten outbound packet to the VPN application 910 . In yet another embodiment, the transmitter 906 transmits a second packet generated by the peripheral device to the client computing device 920 for delivery to a port monitored by the VPN application 910 . The packet rewriter 908 , in communication with the receiver 904 and the transmitter 906 , rewrites address information on the outbound packet 928 . In some embodiments, the packet rewriter 908 rewrites a destination address on the outbound packet 928 with a destination address and a destination port associated with the VPN application 910 . In one embodiment, rewriting the destination address and the destination port enables transmission of the outbound packet to the VPN application 910 . In some embodiments, the packet rewriter 908 generates a mapping table associating information in the outbound packet 928 with information in the modified outbound packet 928 . In one embodiment, the mapping table associates a destination address and a destination port in the outbound packet 928 with the unique source port stored in the modified outbound packet 928 . In another of these embodiments, the mapping table may contain information including an original source address, an original source port, an original destination address, an original destination port, and a unique mapping key used as the source port on rewritten packets. In one embodiment, the packet rewriter 908 , in communication with the receiver 904 and the transmitter 906 , generates a second packet as described above in FIG. 8 . In another embodiment, the packet rewriter 908 generates a unique source port as described above in FIG. 8 . The packet rewriter 908 replaces a destination address and a destination port on the outbound packet 920 with a destination address and destination port associated with the VPN application 910 . In one embodiment, the packet rewriter 908 rewrites the destination address on the outbound packet 928 with an IP address of the client computing device 920 on which the VPN application 910 executes. In another embodiment, the packet rewriter 908 rewrites the destination port on the outbound packet 928 with a port monitored by the VPN application 910 . In some embodiments, the device 900 includes a VPN application 910 , which may include a port forwarder application 912 . In one of these embodiments, the VPN application 910 is stored in the storage element 914 . In another of these embodiments, although the VPN application 410 is stored on the device 900 , it executes on the client computing device 920 . In this embodiment, the VPN application 910 provides secure transmission of a packet 928 without requiring a software installation on the client computing device 920 . In some embodiments, the VPN application 910 receives the rewritten outbound packet 928 from the client computing device 920 . In one of these embodiments, the VPN application 910 uses a unique source address on the rewritten outbound packet 928 to obtain an original destination address. The VPN application 910 may consult a mapping table stored on the storage element 914 on the device 900 to correlate the unique source address on the outbound packet 928 with the original destination address. In another of these embodiments, the VPN application 910 transmits the outbound packet 928 and the original destination address to the VPN gateway computing device 940 . In still another of these embodiments, the VPN gateway computing device 940 receives the outbound packet 928 and the original destination address from the VPN application 910 and forwards the outbound packet 920 to the original destination address. In some embodiments, a port forwarder application 912 provides the functionality of the VPN application 910 . In one of these embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 retrieves the changes to the routing table 930 from the VPN gateway computing device 940 . In another of these embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 authenticates the device 900 to the VPN gateway computing device 940 . In still another of these embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 stores the changes to the routing table 930 in the storage element 914 . In yet another of these embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 uses a unique source port to determine the original destination address of the outbound packet 928 and forward the original destination address and the rewritten outbound packet 928 to the VPN gateway computing device 940 . In one embodiment, the port forwarder application 912 obtains routing rules after presenting the VPN gateway computing device 940 with authentication credentials. The device 900 obtains routing rules from the port forwarder application 912 . In some embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 stores the routing rules on the storage element 914 . Once the VPN tunnel is established and routing information for the network on which the VPN gateway computing device 940 resides is retrieved from the VPN gateway computing device 940 , the VPN application 910 may create a file on the storage element 914 of the mass media device. In one embodiment, the file contains the retrieved routing information. Creation of the file may indicate to the reporting element 916 that it should identify the device 900 to the client computing device 920 as an R-NDIS-capable USB device connected to the client computing device 920 . At this point, the operating system on the client computing device 920 will negotiate (via R-NDIS) a DHCP IP address from the device 900 and adjust its routing tables based on information given to it from the device 900 , which may be derived from the file created by the port forwarder application 912 . The device 900 may communicate with the port forwarder application 912 on the VPN application 910 using IP packets encapsulated in R-NDIS. The device 900 may also send status packets to the port forwarder application 912 . These status packets may convey information regarding state and data structures stored by the device 900 . In some embodiments, to communicate with the port forwarder application 912 , the device 900 transmits packets to a control port and unique IP address associated with the port forwarder application 912 . In one of these embodiments, the device 900 transmits a packet including a unique source port, indicating to the port forwarder application 912 that the device 900 has received a packet with a unique destination address and that the device 900 generated the unique source port to map to the unique destination address. In another of these embodiments, the device 900 transmits a packet indicating to the port forwarder application 912 that the device 900 has removed a mapping between a unique source port and a unique destination address. In still another of these embodiments, the device 900 transmits a packet requesting from the port forward application 912 instructions for responding to a request, such as an Address Resolution Protocol request. In other embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 transmits a communications packet to the device 900 . In one of these embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 transmits to the device 900 a packet indicating that the port forwarder application 912 has successfully opened a connection to the VPN gateway computing device 940 . In another of these embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 transmits to the device 900 a packet indicating that the port forwarder application 912 failed to open a connection to the VPN gateway computing device 940 . In some embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 listens for packets on a plurality of ports, including the following: UDP Traffic Port, TCP Traffic Port, ICMP Traffic Port, and the Control Port. When the port forwarder application 912 receives a packet from a traffic port, such as the UDP traffic port or the TCP traffic port, the port forwarder application 912 uses the unique source port number in the rewritten packet 928 to identify an original destination address. The port forwarder application 912 may then transmit the rewritten packet 928 with the original destination to the VPN gateway computing device 940 . In one embodiment, the port forwarder application 912 transmits the rewritten packet 928 with the original destination to the VPN gateway computing device 940 across an SSL VPN tunnel. In another embodiment, the port forwarder application 912 encrypts the rewritten packet 928 prior to transmission. In some embodiments, the port forwarder application 912 receives a packet from the VPN gateway computing device 940 . In one of these embodiments, the port forwarder application transmits the packet to a port monitored by the device 900 . The device 900 may transmit the received packet to the client computing device 920 for routing the packet to a user application. In some embodiments, a gateway computing device protects a private network by securing a packet transmitted from the private network to a client computing device remotely accessing the private network. To minimize security threats to the private network, the gateway computing device may intercept, inspect, and secure packet traffic sent from a protected system on the private network to the client computing device. In one of these embodiments, the gateway computing device is a virtual VPN gateway computing device using NAT to masquerade the IP addresses of the protected system and of the private network. A NAT-enabled VPN gateway computing device may monitor and secure packet traffic permitting more secure transmission of traffic to dynamic ports on a client computing device from the private network. The VPN gateway computing device may monitor network traffic for packet traffic originating from secured resources and addressed to the client computing device. When this VPN gateway computing device identifies this traffic, the VPN gateway computing device may secure the packets for transmission to the client computing device. Referring now to FIG. 10 , a flow diagram depicts one embodiment of the steps taken in a method for routing packets from a gateway computing device to a client computing device. In brief overview, a private IP address is associated with a client computing device having a public IP address (step 1002 ). A packet addressed to the private IP address of the client computing device is captured (step 1004 ). A policy is applied to the packet (step 1006 ). The packet is transmitted to the public IP address of the client computing device, responsive to the application of the policy to the packet (step 1008 ). A private IP address is associated with a client computing device having a public IP address (step 1002 ). In some embodiments, each connecting client computing device is assigned a private IP address. In one of these embodiments, the private IP address is not available to the client computing device, for security purposes. Since the client computing device does not have the private IP address, if the client computing device is compromised, the private network is still protected. In another of these embodiments, the private IP address is an address in a private network behind the gateway computing device. In some embodiments, associating a private IP address with a client computing device minimizes security risks to the private network behind the gateway computing device. A packet addressed to the private IP address of the client computing device is captured (step 1004 ). In one embodiment, an application generates a packet for transmission to the client computing device. In some embodiments, the application executes on the gateway computing device. In other embodiments, the application executes on a machine residing on a private network behind the gateway computing device. In one embodiment, before the packet is routed to the client computing device, the packet is captured. In some embodiments, a packet on a client computing device is captured by an application executing in kernel mode, such as an NDIS driver or filter. In one of these embodiments, the application executing in kernel mode forwards the packet to an application executing in user mode. Capturing a packet at kernel level, but transmitting the packet from user mode provides the ability to apply higher-level access control on the traffic to ensure that the application that created the packet satisfies security policies of the network to which the packet is transmitted. In some embodiments, a filter on the gateway computing device captures a layer-2 Ethernet MAC frame transmitted to the gateway computing device from a client computing device. In one of these embodiments, a client computing device client application executing in user mode does not modify a routing table on the client computing device. Instead, a filter driver on the client computing device captures traffic below the network level, at the media access control (MAC) layer. The client computing device filter driver may capture and transmit a layer-2 Ethernet MAC frame intact to the gateway computing device, over a secure SSL VPN tunnel. In these embodiments, the filter on the gateway computing device provides functionality for capturing the Ethernet MAC frames in addition to capturing packets. In some embodiments, the packet is inspected after it is captured. In one of these embodiments, the destination address of the packet is inspected. If the destination address is a private IP address associated with the client computing device, the packet may be redirected to a gateway computing device application executing in user mode on the gateway computing device. A policy is applied to the packet (step 1006 ). In one embodiment, a management process applies the policy to the packet. In another embodiment, a policy engine applies the policy to the packet. The policy applied may require performance of a series of security checks, such as Access Control List matching and Deep Packet Inspection, on the received packet. The packet is transmitted to the public IP address of the client computing device, responsive to the application of the policy to the packet (step 1008 ). After a packet has satisfied a policy, the gateway computing device may determine to transmit the packet to the client computing device. In one embodiment, the packet is re-associated with the original source address of the application generating the packet. The packet is forwarded to the client computing device. In some embodiments, the packets are transmitted over a secure SSL socket to the client computing device. Referring now to FIG. 11 , a block diagram depicts one embodiment of a gateway computing device. In brief overview, the gateway computing device 1140 includes a kernel space 1142 and an application space 1150 . The kernel 1142 includes a capture driver 1144 and a transmitter 1148 . The kernel 1142 may include an outbound packet 1146 . The application space 1150 includes a gateway computing device application 1152 , which includes a policy engine 1154 , an addressing element 1156 , and a management process 1160 . The application space 1150 may include an application 1158 . The gateway computing device 1140 includes a capture driver 1144 executing in the kernel 1142 . In some embodiments, an operating system on the gateway computing device 1140 does not readily allow the interception of incoming RAW IP Layer packets. In one of these embodiments, the capture driver 1144 , operating in kernel mode on the gateway computing device 1140 , captures all Ethernet packets destined for remote client computing devices and forwards the packets back to the management process 1160 operating in user mode on the gateway computing device 1140 . In some embodiments, a protected server 1180 , residing on the private network behind the gateway computing device 1140 , generates a packet for transmission to the client computing device 1120 . In one of these embodiments, the protected server 1180 transmits the packet to the gateway computing device for the gateway computing device for transmission to the client computing device. In another of these embodiments, the generated packet is transmitted as an Ethernet frame. In this embodiment, the capture driver 1144 may capture the Ethernet frame when the Ethernet frame arrives at the gateway computing device 1140 . In an embodiment where the capture driver 1144 captures an Ethernet frame, the capture driver 1144 forwards the Ethernet frame to the gateway computing device application 1152 as a frame, not as a packet. In some embodiments, the capture driver 1144 receives a request from the gateway computing device application 1152 for notification of any packet received with a destination address of the private IP address associated with the client computing device 1120 . In one of these embodiments, the capture driver 1144 forwards any Ethernet frame that arrives to the gateway computing device application 1152 over an appropriate raw IP socket. Any reply packets arriving from the client computing device 1120 (even if for a port chosen dynamically by the client computing device 1120 , which is typical of active protocols such as active FTP and SIP), are captured by the capture driver 1144 and forwarded to the management process 1160 in the gateway computing device application 1152 , which manages the SSL tunnel between the gateway computing device 1140 and that particular client computing device 1120 . In some embodiments, the capture driver 1144 inspects all outbound network frames prior to routing. In one of these embodiments, an outbound network frame is a frame transmitted to the gateway computing device 1140 by a protected server 1180 for forwarding to the client computing device 1120 . In another of these embodiments, an application 1158 on the gateway computing device 1140 generates an outbound network frame for transmission to the client computing device 1120 . By inspecting all packets prior to routing, the capture driver 1144 increases security and performance, and minimizes the risk of conflicting entries in an operating system routing table. Inspecting packets prior to routing also increases the ability to control packet flow, without the intervention of the underlying network operating system. Since the capture driver 1144 inspects, and potentially filters, all packets prior to routing, a forwarding decision can be made without use of the routing table. The gateway computing device 1140 includes application space 1150 , on which applications execute, and a gateway computing device application 1152 . In one embodiment, the gateway computing device application 1152 operates in user mode on the application space 1150 . In some embodiments, the gateway computing device application 1152 includes a policy engine 1154 , an addressing element 1156 and a management process 1160 . In one embodiment, the management process 1160 manages the capture driver 1144 . In another embodiment, the management process 1160 receives a captured frame or a captured packet from the capture driver 1144 . In some embodiments, the management process 1160 applies a policy to the packet. In other embodiments, the management process 1160 forwards the captured packet or frame to the policy engine 1154 for packet inspection and policy application. In one embodiment, when a client computing device 1120 connects to the gateway computing device 1140 the gateway computing device 1140 creates a plurality of raw IP sockets for UDP, IP and other protocols such as ICMP. The management process 1160 may request notification from a capture driver 1144 when a packet arrives on the gateway computing device 1140 from a protected server 1180 addressed to a client computing device 1120 . When the capture driver 1144 captures the packet, the capture driver 1144 may transmit the packet to one of the plurality of sockets. In one embodiment, the policy engine 1154 inspects a captured packet or captured frame. In another embodiment, the policy engine 1154 applies a policy to the captured packet or captured frame. In some embodiments, the policy is an access control policy. In other embodiments, application of the policy determines whether the packet originated from a trusted source, such as a protected server 1180 . In some embodiments, the policy engine 1154 transmits a configuration setting to the capture driver 1144 . In one embodiment, the gateway computing device application 1152 includes an addressing element 1156 . The addressing element 1156 may associate a private IP address with a client computing device 1120 . In one embodiment, the private IP address provides the client computing device 1120 with an address on a private network behind the gateway computing device 1140 . In some embodiments, the addressing element 1156 provides functionality for network address translation. In one of these embodiments, the addressing element 1156 transforms a private IP address to a public IP address. This type of transformation may occur on a packet prior to transmission of the packet from a protected server 1180 to a client computing device 1120 , after the policy engine 1154 has approved the packet for transmission to the client computing device 1120 . In other embodiments, when a client computing device 1120 transmits a packet to the gateway computing device 1140 , the addressing element 1156 enables transformation of the source address on the packet from the public IP address associated with the client computing device 1120 to the private IP address associated with the client computing device 1120 . In one of these embodiments, the transformation occurs because the client computing device is not aware of its associated private IP address. After the policy engine 1154 has applied a policy to a captured packet, the policy engine 1154 may determine that the packet may be transmitted to its original destination. In one embodiment, the policy engine 1154 forwards the packet to the transmitter 1148 for transmission to the client computing device 1120 . In another embodiment, the transmitter 1148 first performs a network address translation on the packet. In some embodiments, the transmitter 1148 performs the network address translation. In one of these embodiments, the transmitter 1148 forwards the packet to the addressing element 1156 for transformation of the private IP address to the public IP address of the client computing device. In another of these embodiments, the transmitter 1148 completes the network address translation. In one embodiment, the capture driver 1144 provides the functionality of the transmitter 1148 . In another embodiment, the network address translation occurs in the gateway computing device application 1152 first and then the packet is forwarded to the capture driver 1144 for transmission to the client computing device 1120 . After the transmitter 1148 transmits the packet to the client computing device 1120 , the client application 326 receives the packet from the gateway computing device 1140 and forwards the packet to the filter 322 , using an I/O control message. The filter 322 then marks the packet as an incoming packet and forwards the packet to the destination application via the network stack. The present invention may be provided as one or more computer-readable programs embodied on or in one or more articles of manufacture. The article of manufacture may be a floppy disk, a hard disk, a compact disc, a digital versatile disc, a flash memory card, a PROM, a RAM, a ROM, or a magnetic tape. In general, the computer-readable programs may be implemented in any programming language. Some examples of languages that can be used include C, C++, C#, or JAVA. The software programs may be stored on or in one or more articles of manufacture as object code. While the invention has been shown and described with reference to specific preferred embodiments, it should be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes in form and detail may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the following claims.

Description

Topics

Download Full PDF Version (Non-Commercial Use)

Patent Citations (749)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-2006064500-A1March 23, 2006Microsoft CorporationCaching control for streaming media
    US-2007130324-A1June 07, 2007Jieming WangMethod for detecting non-responsive applications in a TCP-based network
    US-6272146-B1August 07, 2001International Business Machines CorporationBus connection set up and tear down
    US-2003188001-A1October 02, 2003Eisenberg Alfred J., Thompson John A., Bundy David O.System and method for traversing firewalls, NATs, and proxies with rich media communications and other application protocols
    US-2003131263-A1July 10, 2003Opeanreach, Inc.Methods and systems for firewalling virtual private networks
    US-6067569-AMay 23, 2000Microsoft CorporationFast-forwarding and filtering of network packets in a computer system
    US-6728787-B1April 27, 2004Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs, IncSystem and method for locating and installing device drivers for peripheral devices
    US-6529948-B1March 04, 2003Accenture LlpMulti-object fetch component
    US-6606744-B1August 12, 2003Accenture, LlpProviding collaborative installation management in a network-based supply chain environment
    US-7318100-B2January 08, 2008Riverbed Technology, Inc.Cooperative proxy auto-discovery and connection interception
    US-6473794-B1October 29, 2002Accenture LlpSystem for establishing plan to test components of web based framework by displaying pictorial representation and conveying indicia coded components of existing network framework
    US-5359712-AOctober 25, 1994Apple Computer, Inc.Method and apparatus for transitioning between sequences of digital information
    US-6910074-B1June 21, 2005Nortel Networks LimitedSystem and method for service session management in an IP centric distributed network
    US-6163772-ADecember 19, 2000Hewlett-Packard CompanyVirtual point of sale processing using gateway-initiated messages
    US-6826627-B2November 30, 2004Burnbag, Ltd.Data transformation architecture
    US-6170017-B1January 02, 2001International Business Machines CorporationMethod and system coordinating actions among a group of servers
    US-6611867-B1August 26, 2003Accenture LlpSystem, method and article of manufacture for implementing a hybrid network
    US-6370573-B1April 09, 2002Accenture LlpSystem, method and article of manufacture for managing an environment of a development architecture framework
    US-2004010604-A1January 15, 2004Kiko Tanaka, Yasushi OdairaInformation communicating system, information transmitting apparatus and information transmitting method
    US-6383478-B1May 07, 2002Vanderbilt UniversityPolymeric encapsulation system promoting angiogenesis
    US-6678734-B1January 13, 2004Ssh Communications Security Ltd.Method for intercepting network packets in a computing device
    US-6549949-B1April 15, 2003Accenture LlpFixed format stream in a communication services patterns environment
    US-6219669-B1April 17, 2001Hyperspace Communications, Inc.File transfer system using dynamically assigned ports
    US-7321906-B2January 22, 2008Omx Technology AbMethod of improving replica server performance and a replica server system
    US-7100195-B1August 29, 2006Accenture LlpManaging user information on an e-commerce system
    US-6788315-B1September 07, 2004Fujitsu LimitedPlatform independent computer network manager
    US-6681029-B1January 20, 2004Digimarc CorporationDecoding steganographic messages embedded in media signals
    US-6236652-B1May 22, 2001Airbiquity Inc.Geo-spacial Internet protocol addressing
    US-7026954-B2April 11, 2006Bellsouth Intellectual Property CorporationAutomated parking director systems and related methods
    US-6233249-B1May 15, 2001At&T Corp.Methods and apparatus for providing improved quality of packet transmission in applications such as internet telephony
    US-2005144186-A1June 30, 2005Lambertus Hesselink, Dharmarus Rizal, Bjornson Eric S.Managed peer-to-peer applications, systems and methods for distributed data access and storage
    US-6339832-B1January 15, 2002Accenture LlpException response table in environment services patterns
    US-2004143655-A1July 22, 2004Narad Charles E., Kevin Fall, Macavoy Neil, Pradip Shankar, Rand Leonard M., Hall Jerry J.Accessing transmission control protocol (TCP) segments
    US-7757074-B2July 13, 2010Citrix Application Networking, LlcSystem and method for establishing a virtual private network
    US-6253188-B1June 26, 2001Thomson Newspapers, Inc.Automated interactive classified ad system for the internet
    US-6442571-B1August 27, 2002Hyperspace Communications, Inc.Methods and apparatus for secure electronic, certified, restricted delivery mail systems
    US-6574668-B1June 03, 2003Cirrus Logic, Inc.Retransmission scheme in wireless computer networks
    US-5889863-AMarch 30, 1999Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for remote virtual point of sale processing utilizing a multichannel, extensible, flexible architecture
    US-2004103438-A1May 27, 2004Yong Yan, Bo Shen, Sujoy Basu, Rajendra KumarMethods and systems for transferring events including multimedia data
    US-6519571-B1February 11, 2003Accenture LlpDynamic customer profile management
    US-7054944-B2May 30, 2006Intel CorporationAccess control management system utilizing network and application layer access control lists
    US-2003223361-A1December 04, 2003Zahid Hussain, Sachin Desai, Naveed Alam, Joseph Cheng, Tim MilletSystem and method for hierarchical metering in a virtual router based network switch
    US-7199885-B2April 03, 2007Microsoft CorporationGeneric interface
    US-6026379-AFebruary 15, 2000Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for managing transactions in a high availability system
    US-6002767-ADecember 14, 1999Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for a modular gateway server architecture
    US-6754699-B2June 22, 2004Speedera Networks, Inc.Content delivery and global traffic management network system
    US-6820125-B1November 16, 2004International Business Machines CorporationMethod for coordinating actions among a group of servers
    US-2005193075-A1September 01, 2005Hyperspace Communications, Inc.Method, apparatus and system for regulating electronic mail
    US-6652090-B2November 25, 2003Silverbrook Research Pty LtdRecess mountable printing system
    US-2004141525-A1July 22, 2004Naga Bhushan, Black Peter J., Attar Rashid AhmedPower boosting in a wireless communication system
    US-6687732-B1February 03, 2004Inktomi CorporationAdaptive traffic bypassing in an intercepting network driver
    US-5521940-AMay 28, 1996Ouest Standard Telematique SaMethod and device for the compression and decompression of data in a transmission system
    US-6502213-B1December 31, 2002Accenture LlpSystem, method, and article of manufacture for a polymorphic exception handler in environment services patterns
    US-7016055-B2March 21, 2006Microsoft CorporationSynchronization of plugins
    US-6976090-B2December 13, 2005Actona Technologies Ltd.Differentiated content and application delivery via internet
    US-6178409-B1January 23, 2001Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for multiple-entry point virtual point of sale architecture
    US-6662221-B1December 09, 2003Lucent Technologies Inc.Integrated network and service management with automated flow through configuration and provisioning of virtual private networks
    US-6026413-AFebruary 15, 2000International Business Machines CorporationDetermining how changes to underlying data affect cached objects
    US-2005050317-A1March 03, 2005Andre Kramer, William HarwoodA system and method of exploiting the security of a secure communication channel to secure a non-secure communication channel
    US-7197570-B2March 27, 2007Appstream Inc.System and method to send predicted application streamlets to a client device
    US-6192408-B1February 20, 2001Emc CorporationNetwork file server sharing local caches of file access information in data processors assigned to respective file systems
    US-5911051-AJune 08, 1999Intel CorporationHigh-throughput interconnect allowing bus transactions based on partial access requests
    US-6324582-B1November 27, 2001Sitara Networks, Inc.Enhanced network communication
    US-6434568-B1August 13, 2002Accenture LlpInformation services patterns in a netcentric environment
    US-5758110-AMay 26, 1998Intel CorporationApparatus and method for application sharing in a graphic user interface
    US-5983208-ANovember 09, 1999Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for handling transaction results in a gateway payment architecture utilizing a multichannel, extensible, flexible architecture
    US-5850446-ADecember 15, 1998Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for virtual point of sale processing utilizing an extensible, flexible architecture
    US-7080041-B2July 18, 2006Esecuredocs, Inc.System and method for production and authentication of original documents
    US-6650640-B1November 18, 2003Sun Microsystems, Inc.Method and apparatus for managing a network flow in a high performance network interface
    US-2004202171-A1October 14, 2004Daisuke HamaNetwork and edge router
    US-7124442-B2October 17, 2006440 Pammel, Inc.System and method for insertion and retrieval of microthreads in transmitted data
    US-6640249-B1October 28, 2003Accenture LlpPresentation services patterns in a netcentric environment
    US-6697824-B1February 24, 2004Accenture LlpRelationship management in an E-commerce application framework
    US-6990070-B1January 24, 2006Nortel Networks LimitedMethod and apparatus for adjusting packet transmission volume from a source
    US-2008320151-A1December 25, 2008Riverbed Technology, Inc.Transaction accelerator for client-server communications systems
    US-6442682-B1August 27, 2002Auspex Systems, Inc.Characterization of data access using file system
    US-6496481-B1December 17, 2002Industrial Technology Research InstituteData transfer method for wire real-time communications
    US-6601192-B1July 29, 2003Accenture LlpAssertion component in environment services patterns
    US-6061769-AMay 09, 2000International Business Machines CorporationData set backup in a shared environment
    US-5958016-ASeptember 28, 1999Bell Atlantic Network Services, Inc.Internet-web link for access to intelligent network service control
    US-6697844-B1February 24, 2004Lucent Technologies, Inc.Internet browsing using cache-based compaction
    US-2005232161-A1October 20, 2005Maufer Thomas A, Sidenblad Paul JMethod and apparatus for reducing TCP frame transmit latency
    US-2006112185-A1May 25, 2006Van Bemmel JeroenMethod and apparatus for pre-packetized caching for network servers
    US-5999179-ADecember 07, 1999Fujitsu LimitedPlatform independent computer network management client
    US-7272853-B2September 18, 2007Microsoft CorporationOrigination/destination features and lists for spam prevention
    US-6173325-B1January 09, 2001Microsoft CorporationMethod computer program product, and system for assessing the performance of a packet schedule
    US-6477665-B1November 05, 2002Accenture LlpSystem, method, and article of manufacture for environment services patterns in a netcentic environment
    US-7027055-B2April 11, 2006The Commonwealth Of AustraliaData view of a modelling system
    US-7039606-B2May 02, 2006Restaurant Services, Inc.System, method and computer program product for contract consistency in a supply chain management framework
    US-6452923-B1September 17, 2002At&T CorpCable connected wan interconnectivity services for corporate telecommuters
    US-5671226-ASeptember 23, 1997Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaMultimedia information processing system
    WO-2006012612-A1February 02, 2006Citrix Systems, Inc.Procede et systemes de securisation d'acces a distance a des reseaux prives
    US-4935870-AJune 19, 1990Keycom Electronic PublishingApparatus for downloading macro programs and executing a downloaded macro program responding to activation of a single key
    US-2005165928-A1July 28, 2005Jesse Shu, Yonghui ChengWireless firewall with tear down messaging
    US-7149959-B1December 12, 2006Autodesk, Inc.Method and apparatus for providing drawing collaboration on a network
    US-6438594-B1August 20, 2002Accenture LlpDelivering service to a client via a locally addressable interface
    US-7606902-B2October 20, 2009Citrix Systems, Inc.Method and systems for routing packets from an endpoint to a gateway
    US-2005027788-A1February 03, 2005Koopmans Christopher Raymond, Koopmans Frederick Alan, Stavrakos Nicholas James, Amalraj AntonysamyMethod and system for dynamic interleaving
    US-2004078772-A1April 22, 2004Cosine Communications, Inc.Dynamic route exchange
    US-7023979-B1April 04, 2006Wai Wu, Toby Heller, Hoffberg Steven MTelephony control system with intelligent call routing
    US-7131596-B2November 07, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdSymmetric data tags
    US-7028334-B2April 11, 2006Corente, Inc.Methods and systems for using names in virtual networks
    US-6122403-ASeptember 19, 2000Digimarc CorporationComputer system linked by using information in data objects
    US-6304915-B1October 16, 2001Hewlett-Packard CompanySystem, method and article of manufacture for a gateway system architecture with system administration information accessible from a browser
    US-5987132-ANovember 16, 1999Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for conditionally accepting a payment method utilizing an extensible, flexible architecture
    US-6233606-B1May 15, 2001Microsoft CorporationAutomatic cache synchronization
    US-6550057-B1April 15, 2003Accenture LlpPiecemeal retrieval in an information services patterns environment
    US-6802020-B1October 05, 2004International Business Machines CorporationApparatus and method for dynamically rerouting a network request based on shared predictive failure information
    US-2004087304-A1May 06, 2004Buddhikot Milind M., Chandranmenon Girish P., Seung-Jae Han, Yui-Wah Lee, Miller Scott C., Luca SalgarelliIntegrated web cache
    US-2004042487-A1March 04, 2004Tehuti Networks Inc.Network traffic accelerator system and method
    US-7155676-B2December 26, 2006CoolernetSystem and method for multimedia authoring and playback
    US-5987482-ANovember 16, 1999International Business Machines CorporationComputer system and method of displaying hypertext documents with internal hypertext link definitions
    US-7392348-B2June 24, 2008International Business Machines CorporationMethod for validating remotely cached dynamic content web pages
    US-6907546-B1June 14, 2005Accenture LlpLanguage-driven interface for an automated testing framework
    US-6507891-B1January 14, 2003International Business Machines CorporationMethod and apparatus for managing internal caches and external caches in a data processing system
    US-6131120-AOctober 10, 2000Directory Logic, Inc.Enterprise network management directory containing network addresses of users and devices providing access lists to routers and servers
    US-6633878-B1October 14, 2003Accenture LlpInitializing an ecommerce database framework
    US-6092155-AJuly 18, 2000International Business Machines CorporationCache coherent network adapter for scalable shared memory processing systems
    US-6578068-B1June 10, 2003Accenture LlpLoad balancer in environment services patterns
    US-6434618-B1August 13, 2002Lucent Technologies Inc.Programmable network element for packet-switched computer network
    US-7028083-B2April 11, 2006Akomai Technologies, Inc.Method for extending a network map
    US-6640238-B1October 28, 2003Accenture LlpActivity component in a presentation services patterns environment
    US-6633574-B1October 14, 2003Loytec Electronics GmbhDynamic wait acknowledge for network protocol
    US-6671818-B1December 30, 2003Accenture LlpProblem isolation through translating and filtering events into a standard object format in a network based supply chain
    US-6308273-B1October 23, 2001Microsoft CorporationMethod and system of security location discrimination
    US-6954736-B2October 11, 2005Restaurant Services, Inc.System, method and computer program product for order confirmation in a supply chain management framework
    US-2004107360-A1June 03, 2004Zone Labs, Inc.System and Methodology for Policy Enforcement
    US-6289450-B1September 11, 2001Authentica, Inc.Information security architecture for encrypting documents for remote access while maintaining access control
    US-6457103-B1September 24, 2002International Business Machines CorporationMethod and apparatus for caching content in a data processing system with fragment granularity
    US-6785719-B1August 31, 2004Digi International Inc.Distributed systems for providing secured HTTP communications over the network
    US-2005195780-A1September 08, 2005Henry Haverinen, Heikki Riittinen, Pasi EronenIP mobility in mobile telecommunications system
    US-7031314-B2April 18, 2006Bytemobile, Inc.Systems and methods for providing differentiated services within a network communication system
    US-6591266-B1July 08, 2003Nec CorporationSystem and method for intelligent caching and refresh of dynamically generated and static web content
    US-6447113-B1September 10, 2002Silverbrook Research Pty LtdDuplex inkjet printing system
    US-6640248-B1October 28, 2003Malibu Networks, Inc.Application-aware, quality of service (QoS) sensitive, media access control (MAC) layer
    US-6484206-B2November 19, 2002Nortel Networks LimitedEfficient recovery of multiple connections in a communication network
    US-5931917-AAugust 03, 1999Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for a gateway system architecture with system administration information accessible from a browser
    US-5787470-AJuly 28, 1998At&T CorpInter-cache protocol for improved WEB performance
    US-2005033926-A1February 10, 2005International Business Machines CorporationMethod, system and program product for validating remotely cached dynamic content web pages
    US-6880086-B2April 12, 2005Ciena CorporationSignatures for facilitating hot upgrades of modular software components
    US-6502192-B1December 31, 2002Cisco Technology, Inc.Security between client and server in a computer network
    US-6398359-B1June 04, 2002Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinter transfer roller with internal drive motor
    US-6502102-B1December 31, 2002Accenture LlpSystem, method and article of manufacture for a table-driven automated scripting architecture
    US-6578073-B1June 10, 2003Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Accelerated content delivery over a network using reduced size objects
    US-6957186-B1October 18, 2005Accenture LlpSystem method and article of manufacture for building, managing, and supporting various components of a system
    US-6112085-AAugust 29, 2000Amsc Subsidiary CorporationVirtual network configuration and management system for satellite communication system
    US-6333931-B1December 25, 2001Cisco Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for interconnecting a circuit-switched telephony network and a packet-switched data network, and applications thereof
    US-6021470-AFebruary 01, 2000Oracle CorporationMethod and apparatus for selective data caching implemented with noncacheable and cacheable data for improved cache performance in a computer networking system
    US-2005262357-A1November 24, 2005Aep NetworksNetwork access using reverse proxy
    US-7415723-B2August 19, 2008Pandya Ashish ADistributed network security system and a hardware processor therefor
    US-6704873-B1March 09, 2004Accenture LlpSecure gateway interconnection in an e-commerce based environment
    US-2004225898-A1November 11, 2004Frost D. Gabriel, Miller David D.System and method for ubiquitous network access
    US-7146644-B2December 05, 2006Digital Doors, Inc.Data security system and method responsive to electronic attacks
    US-5996076-ANovember 30, 1999Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for secure digital certification of electronic commerce
    US-6611262-B1August 26, 2003Sony CorporationGeneration of a bit stream containing binary image/audio data that is multiplexed with a code defining an object in ascii format
    US-5708656-AJanuary 13, 1998Nokia Mobile Phones LimitedMethod and apparatus for packet data transmission
    US-6536037-B1March 18, 2003Accenture LlpIdentification of redundancies and omissions among components of a web based architecture
    US-5822524-AOctober 13, 1998Infovalue Computing, Inc.System for just-in-time retrieval of multimedia files over computer networks by transmitting data packets at transmission rate determined by frame size
    US-6553129-B1April 22, 2003Digimarc CorporationComputer system linked by using information in data objects
    US-6691227-B1February 10, 2004Reefedge, Inc.Location-independent packet routing and secure access in a short-range wireless networking environment
    US-6912522-B2June 28, 2005Ablesoft, Inc.System, method and computer program product for optimization and acceleration of data transport and processing
    US-6272556-B1August 07, 2001Sun Microsystems, Inc.Object-oriented system, method and article of manufacture for migrating a client-server application (#5)
    US-6061796-AMay 09, 2000V-One CorporationMulti-access virtual private network
    US-6925495-B2August 02, 2005Vendaria Media, Inc.Method and system for delivering and monitoring an on-demand playlist over a network using a template
    US-6826626-B1November 30, 2004Clear Blue Technologies Management, Inc.Method of and apparatus for rapid retrieval of data in a content distribution network
    US-6484143-B1November 19, 2002Speedera Networks, Inc.User device and system for traffic management and content distribution over a world wide area network
    US-6615199-B1September 02, 2003Accenture, LlpAbstraction factory in a base services pattern environment
    US-6452915-B1September 17, 2002Malibu Networks, Inc.IP-flow classification in a wireless point to multi-point (PTMP) transmission system
    US-7673048-B1March 02, 2010Cisco Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatus for establishing a computerized device tunnel connection
    US-5812668-ASeptember 22, 1998Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for verifying the operation of a remote transaction clearance system utilizing a multichannel, extensible, flexible architecture
    US-7120852-B2October 10, 2006Nokia CorporationMethod and apparatus for packet aggregation in a wireless communication network
    US-7055169-B2May 30, 2006Opentv, Inc.Supporting common interactive television functionality through presentation engine syntax
    US-6615166-B1September 02, 2003Accenture LlpPrioritizing components of a network framework required for implementation of technology
    US-7120596-B2October 10, 2006Restaurant Services, Inc.System, method and computer program product for landed cost reporting in a supply chain management framework
    US-7146384-B2December 05, 2006Transtech Pharma, Inc.System and method for data analysis, manipulation, and visualization
    US-7197374-B2March 27, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdRobotic assembly
    US-7000012-B2February 14, 2006Microsoft CorporationSystems and methods for uniquely identifying networks by correlating each network name with the application programming interfaces of transport protocols supported by the network
    US-6473802-B2October 29, 2002F5 Networks, Inc.Method and system for storing load balancing information with an HTTP cookie
    US-7171379-B2January 30, 2007Restaurant Services, Inc.System, method and computer program product for normalizing data in a supply chain management framework
    US-6823374-B2November 23, 2004Fineground NetworksAdjusting the cacheability of web documents according to the responsiveness of its content server
    US-2002057717-A1May 16, 2002Mallory Tracy D.Method of sharing information among a plurality of stations in a frame-based communications networK
    US-5561769-AOctober 01, 1996Lucent Technologies Inc.Method and apparatus for executing a distributed algorithm or service on a simple network management protocol based computer network
    US-5625793-AApril 29, 1997International Business Machines CorporationAutomatic cache bypass for instructions exhibiting poor cache hit ratio
    US-6615253-B1September 02, 2003Accenture LlpEfficient server side data retrieval for execution of client side applications
    US-2005265315-A1December 01, 2005Ablesoft, Inc.System, method, and computer program product for optimization and acceleration of data transport and processing
    US-2005022012-A1January 27, 2005Derek Bluestone, Clint Adams, Sriniyas Yalamarti, Pierre-Philippe LebelClient-side network access polices and management applications
    US-2003014624-A1January 16, 2003Andes Networks, Inc.Non-proxy internet communication
    US-5329619-AJuly 12, 1994Software AgCooperative processing interface and communication broker for heterogeneous computing environments
    US-6529909-B1March 04, 2003Accenture LlpMethod for translating an object attribute converter in an information services patterns environment
    US-6820974-B2November 23, 2004Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInkjet printer incorporating a media tray assembly
    US-7164680-B2January 16, 2007Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Scheme for supporting real-time packetization and retransmission in rate-based streaming applications
    US-7057759-B2June 06, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdMemory configuration in a printer that simultaneously prints on both surfaces of a sheet of print media
    US-6920502-B2July 19, 2005Netilla Networks, Inc.Apparatus and accompanying methods for providing, through a centralized server site, an integrated virtual office environment, remotely accessible via a network-connected web browser, with remote network monitoring and management capabilities
    US-7175089-B2February 13, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdFace determination
    US-6918665-B2July 19, 2005Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinting system with compact transfer roller
    US-2004177359-A1September 09, 2004Bauch David James, Ryd Warren David, Arteun Mats LennartSupporting the exchange of data by distributed applications
    US-2003191799-A1October 09, 2003Netilla Networks, Inc.Apparatus and accompanying methods for providing, through a centralized server site, a secure, cost-effective, web-enabled, integrated virtual office environment remotely accessible through a network-connected web browser
    US-2004210320-A1October 21, 2004Pandya Ashish A.Runtime adaptable protocol processor
    US-7181766-B2February 20, 2007Corente, Inc.Methods and system for providing network services using at least one processor interfacing a base network
    US-7207485-B2April 24, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdAutomatic packaging system
    US-2003200295-A1October 23, 2003Roberts David Gary, Sanjay Dhawan, Mahesh Kumar, Gibson Glen William, Bala Sankaranarayanan, Sam RajarathinamNetwork system having a virtual-service-module
    US-7644188-B2January 05, 2010Intel CorporationDistributing tasks in data communications
    US-7398552-B2July 08, 2008Hughes Network Systems, LlcMethod and system for integrating performance enhancing functions in a virtual private network (VPN)
    US-2002038339-A1March 28, 2002Wei XuSystems and methods for packet distribution
    US-6721713-B1April 13, 2004Andersen Consulting LlpBusiness alliance identification in a web architecture framework
    US-6901072-B1May 31, 2005Foundry Networks, Inc.System and method for high speed packet transmission implementing dual transmit and receive pipelines
    US-6598075-B1July 22, 2003Intercall, Inc.Method and system for using multiple networks to provide a presentation
    US-7124101-B1October 17, 2006Accenture LlpAsset tracking in a network-based supply chain environment
    US-6601234-B1July 29, 2003Accenture LlpAttribute dictionary in a business logic services environment
    US-5657390-AAugust 12, 1997Netscape Communications CorporationSecure socket layer application program apparatus and method
    US-7103068-B1September 05, 2006Sprint Communication Company L.P.System and method for configuring bandwidth transmission rates for call connections
    US-7155518-B2December 26, 2006Interactive People Unplugged AbExtranet workgroup formation across multiple mobile virtual private networks
    US-2002071438-A1June 13, 2002Singh Amit P.Network architecture and methods for transparent on-line cross-sessional encoding and transport of network communications data
    US-7184445-B2February 27, 2007Silverback Systems Inc.Architecture and API for of transport and upper layer protocol processing acceleration
    US-7406533-B2July 29, 2008Seiko Epson CorporationMethod and apparatus for tunneling data through a single port
    US-2006133405-A1June 22, 2006Mci, Inc.System and method for providing service-agnostic network resources
    US-2005022011-A1January 27, 2005Microsoft CorporationMulti-layer based method for implementing network firewalls
    US-2003223433-A1December 04, 2003Jung-Tae Lee, Ku-Hwan Kim, Gyu-Sung Cho, Yun-Young GoInternet protocol system using hardware protocol processing logic and parallel data processing method using the same
    US-6119105-ASeptember 12, 2000Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for initiation of software distribution from a point of certificate creation utilizing an extensible, flexible architecture
    US-6735601-B1May 11, 2004Vmware, Inc.System and method for remote file access by computer
    US-6072870-AJune 06, 2000Verifone Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for a gateway payment architecture utilizing a multichannel, extensible, flexible architecture
    US-6412000-B1June 25, 2002Packeteer, Inc.Method for automatically classifying traffic in a packet communications network
    US-6345239-B1February 05, 2002Accenture LlpRemote demonstration of business capabilities in an e-commerce environment
    US-6842906-B1January 11, 2005Accenture LlpSystem and method for a refreshable proxy pool in a communication services patterns environment
    US-6601233-B1July 29, 2003Accenture LlpBusiness components framework
    US-6807607-B1October 19, 2004International Business Machines CorporationCache memory management system and method
    US-2004205439-A1October 14, 2004International Business Machines CorporationLiveness monitoring in a publish/subscribe messaging system
    US-2008034416-A1February 07, 2008Arkesh Kumar, James Harris, Ajay SoniMethods and systems for routing packets in a vpn-client-to-vpn-client connection via an ssl/vpn network appliance
    US-5956483-ASeptember 21, 1999Microsoft CorporationSystem and method for making function calls from a web browser to a local application
    US-6744774-B2June 01, 2004Nokia, Inc.Dynamic routing over secure networks
    US-6652089-B2November 25, 2003Silverbrook Research Pty LtdDuplex inkjet printing system
    US-5835726-ANovember 10, 1998Check Point Software Technologies Ltd.System for securing the flow of and selectively modifying packets in a computer network
    US-7188769-B2March 13, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdLaser scanner using rotating holographic optical element
    US-7389462-B1June 17, 2008Istor Networks, Inc.System and methods for high rate hardware-accelerated network protocol processing
    US-6718535-B1April 06, 2004Accenture LlpSystem, method and article of manufacture for an activity framework design in an e-commerce based environment
    US-6789170-B1September 07, 2004Oracle International CorporationSystem and method for customizing cached data
    US-2005022031-A1January 27, 2005Microsoft CorporationAdvanced URL and IP features
    US-6496935-B1December 17, 2002Check Point Software Technologies LtdSystem, device and method for rapid packet filtering and processing
    US-6571282-B1May 27, 2003Accenture LlpBlock-based communication in a communication services patterns environment
    US-2005132030-A1June 16, 2005Aventail CorporationNetwork appliance
    US-4885680-ADecember 05, 1989International Business Machines CorporationMethod and apparatus for efficiently handling temporarily cacheable data
    US-6405364-B1June 11, 2002Accenture LlpBuilding techniques in a development architecture framework
    US-6373950-B1April 16, 2002Hewlett-Packard CompanySystem, method and article of manufacture for transmitting messages within messages utilizing an extensible, flexible architecture
    US-7159777-B2January 09, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdTransparent conveyor for check-out scanning
    US-7178106-B2February 13, 2007Sonic Solutions, A California CorporationPresentation of media content from multiple media sources
    US-6954877-B2October 11, 2005Agami Systems, Inc.Fault tolerance using logical checkpointing in computing systems
    US-2004221031-A1November 04, 2004Oracle International CorporationMethod and apparatus using connection pools in communication networks
    US-7363378-B2April 22, 2008Microsoft CorporationTransport system for instant messaging
    US-6873988-B2March 29, 2005Check Point Software Technologies, Inc.System and methods providing anti-virus cooperative enforcement
    US-7085834-B2August 01, 2006Oracle International CorporationDetermining a user's groups
    US-6640244-B1October 28, 2003Accenture LlpRequest batcher in a transaction services patterns environment
    US-7197502-B2March 27, 2007Friendly Polynomials, Inc.Machine-implemented activity management system using asynchronously shared activity data objects and journal data items
    US-6496776-B1December 17, 2002Brad W. Blumberg, Eric M. BlumbergPosition-based information access device and method
    US-5828840-AOctober 27, 1998Verifone, Inc.Server for starting client application on client if client is network terminal and initiating client application on server if client is non network terminal
    US-6640240-B1October 28, 2003Pivia, Inc.Method and apparatus for a dynamic caching system
    US-2005198380-A1September 08, 2005Citrix Systems, Inc.A persistent and reliable session securely traversing network components using an encapsulating protocol
    US-6539396-B1March 25, 2003Accenture LlpMulti-object identifier system and method for information service pattern environment
    US-2006031547-A1February 09, 2006Wyse Technology Inc.System and method for integrated on-demand delivery of operating system and applications
    US-2005135250-A1June 23, 2005Balraj Singh, Singh Amit P., Vern PaxsonTransparent optimization for transmission control protocol initial session establishment
    US-2005102529-A1May 12, 2005Buddhikot Milind M., Chandranmenon Girish P., Seung-Jae Han, Yui-Wah Lee, Miller Scott C., Luca SalgarelliMobility access gateway
    US-5925100-AJuly 20, 1999Sybase, Inc.Client/server system with methods for prefetching and managing semantic objects based on object-based prefetch primitive present in client's executing application
    US-7401116-B1July 15, 2008Silicon Graphics, Inc.System and method for allowing remote users to specify graphics application parameters for generation of interactive images
    US-7055028-B2May 30, 2006Juniper Networks, Inc.HTTP multiplexor/demultiplexor system for use in secure transactions
    US-2007067366-A1March 22, 2007Landis John AScalable partition memory mapping system
    WO-2004088933-A1October 14, 2004Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ)Device and method for rate adaptation between bit streams
    US-6253027-B1June 26, 2001Hewlett-Packard CompanySystem, method and article of manufacture for exchanging software and configuration data over a multichannel, extensible, flexible architecture
    US-7167844-B1January 23, 2007Accenture LlpElectronic menu document creator in a virtual financial environment
    US-6161123-ADecember 12, 2000Intermec Ip CorporationProviding reliable communication over an unreliable transport layer in a hand-held device using a persistent session
    US-7130807-B1October 31, 2006Accenture LlpTechnology sharing during demand and supply planning in a network-based supply chain environment
    US-7126955-B2October 24, 2006F5 Networks, Inc.Architecture for efficient utilization and optimum performance of a network
    US-2004073716-A1April 15, 2004Boom Douglas D., Connor Patrick L., Montecalvo Mark V., Dubal Scott P.System, device and method for media data offload processing
    US-2003217105-A1November 20, 2003Groove Networks, Inc.Method and apparatus for connecting a secure peer-to-peer collaboration system to an external system
    US-7225382-B2May 29, 2007Telefonakiebolaget Lm Ericsson (Publ)Incremental redundancy operation in a wireless communication network
    US-6574688-B1June 03, 2003Agere Systems Inc.Port manager controller for connecting various function modules
    US-7441119-B2October 21, 2008International Business Machines CorporationOffload processing for secure data transfer
    US-7020719-B1March 28, 2006Netli, Inc.System and method for high-performance delivery of Internet messages by selecting first and second specialized intermediate nodes to optimize a measure of communications performance between the source and the destination
    US-2003051100-A1March 13, 2003International Business Machines CorporationContent caching with special handling of multiple identical requests for content
    US-7047279-B1May 16, 2006Accenture, LlpCreating collaborative application sharing
    US-6442748-B1August 27, 2002Accenture LlpSystem, method and article of manufacture for a persistent state and persistent object separator in an information services patterns environment
    US-7149698-B2December 12, 2006Accenture, LlpBusiness alliance identification in a web architecture Framework
    US-6175869-B1January 16, 2001Lucent Technologies Inc.Client-side techniques for web server allocation
    US-2003208602-A1November 06, 2003Cisco Technology, Inc.System and method for pushing data in an internet protocol network environment
    US-6233619-B1May 15, 2001Unisys CorporationVirtual transport layer interface and messaging subsystem for high-speed communications between heterogeneous computer systems
    US-6775392-B1August 10, 2004Digimarc CorporationComputer system linked by using information in data objects
    US-2008046616-A1February 21, 2008Citrix Systems, Inc.Systems and Methods of Symmetric Transport Control Protocol Compression
    US-7072843-B2July 04, 2006Restaurant Services, Inc.System, method and computer program product for error checking in a supply chain management framework
    US-6157955-ADecember 05, 2000Intel CorporationPacket processing system including a policy engine having a classification unit
    US-6697849-B1February 24, 2004Sun Microsystems, Inc.System and method for caching JavaServer Pages™ responses
    US-6820133-B1November 16, 2004Netli, Inc.System and method for high-performance delivery of web content using high-performance communications protocol between the first and second specialized intermediate nodes to optimize a measure of communications performance between the source and the destination
    US-7353533-B2April 01, 2008Novell, Inc.Administration of protection of data accessible by a mobile device
    US-7034691-B1April 25, 2006Solvetech CorporationAdaptive communication methods and systems for facilitating the gathering, distribution and delivery of information related to medical care
    US-7092370-B2August 15, 2006Roamware, Inc.Method and system for wireless voice channel/data channel integration
    US-7113962-B1September 26, 2006F5 Networks, Inc.Method and system for automatically updating content stored on servers connected by a network
    US-2006089996-A1April 27, 2006Juniper Networks, Inc.Connection management system and method
    US-5758085-AMay 26, 1998International Business Machines CorporationSemiconductor memory based server for providing multimedia information on demand over wide area networks
    US-5864837-AJanuary 26, 1999Unisys CorporationMethods and apparatus for efficient caching in a distributed environment
    US-7096418-B1August 22, 2006Persistence Software, Inc.Dynamic web page cache
    US-5978840-ANovember 02, 1999Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for a payment gateway system architecture for processing encrypted payment transactions utilizing a multichannel, extensible, flexible architecture
    US-6144775-ANovember 07, 2000Xerox CorporationMethod and system for storing error values for an image conversion process utilizing dynamic error diffusion
    US-6609128-B1August 19, 2003Accenture LlpCodes table framework design in an E-commerce architecture
    US-2003177395-A1September 18, 2003Hughes ElectronicsMethod and system for integrating performance enhancing functions in a virtual private network (VPN)
    US-2002176532-A1November 28, 2002Mcclelland Keith M., Craig Dawson, Ying Huang, Whitson Andrea L.Remote baggage screening system, software and method
    US-7042879-B2May 09, 2006General Instrument CorporationMethod and apparatus for transferring a communication session
    US-7536715-B2May 19, 2009Secure Computing CorporationDistributed firewall system and method
    US-5819020-AOctober 06, 1998Network Specialists, Inc.Real time backup system
    US-6370599-B1April 09, 2002Microsoft CorporationSystem for ascertaining task off-load capabilities of a device and enabling selected capabilities and when needed selectively and dynamically requesting the device to perform the task
    US-5301270-AApril 05, 1994Anderson ConsultingComputer-assisted software engineering system for cooperative processing environments
    US-6431777-B1August 13, 2002Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinter for incorporation into systems with limited access
    US-6996631-B1February 07, 2006International Business Machines CorporationSystem having a single IP address associated with communication protocol stacks in a cluster of processing systems
    US-6990480-B1January 24, 2006Trancept LimitedInformation manager method and system
    US-6253327-B1June 26, 2001Cisco Technology, Inc.Single step network logon based on point to point protocol
    US-6629081-B1September 30, 2003Accenture LlpAccount settlement and financing in an e-commerce environment
    US-5943424-AAugust 24, 1999Hewlett-Packard CompanySystem, method and article of manufacture for processing a plurality of transactions from a single initiation point on a multichannel, extensible, flexible architecture
    US-2005125663-A1June 09, 2005Funk Software, Inc.Tunneled authentication protocol for preventing man-in-the-middle attacks
    US-7152207-B1December 19, 2006Decentrix Inc.Method and apparatus for providing conditional customization for generating a web site
    US-6389462-B1May 14, 2002Lucent Technologies Inc.Method and apparatus for transparently directing requests for web objects to proxy caches
    US-2004249975-A1December 09, 2004Tuck Teo Wee, Rhandeev SinghComputer networks
    US-6870921-B1March 22, 2005Metro One Telecommunications, Inc.Enhanced directory assistance service providing individual or group directories
    US-2004268357-A1December 30, 2004Joy Joseph M., Sivathanup Karthic NadarajapillaiNetwork load balancing with session information
    US-2005055690-A1March 10, 2005Microsoft CorporationSystem and method for communication between computers via an integrated hardware device
    US-6606660-B1August 12, 2003Accenture LlpStream-based communication in a communication services patterns environment
    US-6496850-B1December 17, 2002Accenture LlpClean-up of orphaned server contexts
    US-7134131-B1November 07, 2006Sedna Patent Services, LlcDigital broadcast program billing
    US-2002059435-A1May 16, 2002John Border, Ken BurrellMethod and system for improving network performance using a performance enhancing proxy
    US-7228459-B2June 05, 2007Tellabs Petaluma, Inc.Apparatus and method that provides a primary server and a backup server that both support a RADIUS client and share an IP address
    US-7187470-B2March 06, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrint engine mechanism
    US-6664978-B1December 16, 2003Fujitsu LimitedClient-server computer network management architecture
    US-6883068-B2April 19, 2005Sun Microsystems, Inc.Methods and apparatus for implementing a chche replacement scheme
    US-2004044521-A1March 04, 2004Microsoft CorporationUnified lossy and lossless audio compression
    US-6631986-B2October 14, 2003Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinter transport roller with internal drive motor
    US-6611822-B1August 26, 2003Ac Properties B.V.System method and article of manufacture for creating collaborative application sharing
    US-2008229381-A1September 18, 2008Namit Sikka, Anoop Reddy, Rajiv Mirani, Abhishek ChauhanSystems and methods for managing application security profiles
    US-6647130-B2November 11, 2003Digimarc CorporationPrintable interfaces and digital linking with embedded codes
    US-5995999-ANovember 30, 1999Fujitsu LimitedNaming system for hierarchically named computer accessible objects
    US-6553409-B1April 22, 2003Microsoft CorporationBackground cache synchronization
    US-6760748-B1July 06, 2004Accenture LlpInstructional system grouping student terminals
    US-2004008693-A1January 15, 2004Grove Adam J., Michael Kharitonov, Alexei TumarkinSystem for fast recovery from losses for reliable data communication protocols
    US-2003149899-A1August 07, 2003International Business Machines CorporationSystem and method for network address translation integration with IP security
    US-6801927-B1October 05, 2004Akamba CorporationNetwork adaptor card with reverse proxy and cache and method implemented therewith
    US-7010300-B1March 07, 2006Sprint Spectrum L.P.Method and system for intersystem wireless communications session hand-off
    US-7085683-B2August 01, 2006The Commonwealth Of AustraliaData processing and observation system
    US-7398320-B1July 08, 2008Fujitsu LimitedInformation distribution/reproduction control apparatus, information distribution/reproduction control method, and computer-readable recording medium recorded with information distribution/reproduction control program
    US-2007192827-A1August 16, 2007Mark Maxted, Matthew Thurston, Kevin Porter, Chris Zuercher, Doug MoenMethod and apparatus for policy management in a network device
    US-2007008883-A1January 11, 2007Nec CorporationTransport layer relay method, transport layer relay device, and program
    US-5933605-AAugust 03, 1999Hitachi, Ltd.Apparatus for filtering multicast messages transmitted between subnetworks based upon the message content
    US-5940074-AAugust 17, 1999Webtv Networks, Inc.Remote upgrade of software over a network
    US-2006041635-A1February 23, 2006Microsoft CorporationFlexible teleport architecture
    US-6449658-B1September 10, 2002Quikcat.Com, Inc.Method and apparatus for accelerating data through communication networks
    US-2002107990-A1August 08, 2002Surgient Networks, Inc.Network connected computing system including network switch
    US-6993016-B1January 31, 2006Juniper Networks, Inc.Methods and apparatus for transmission of analog channels over digital packet networks
    US-2005149726-A1July 07, 2005Amit Joshi, Ananta Iyengar, Anurag Sharma, Finnur Thorarinsson, Johann Sigurdsson, Sanjeev Radhakrishnan, Sigurdur Asgeirsson, Sunil Shilimkar, Tomas Gunnarsson, Wayne GraySystems and methods for secure client applications
    US-6029175-AFebruary 22, 2000Teknowledge CorporationAutomatic retrieval of changed files by a network software agent
    US-6594690-B2July 15, 2003Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Network peripheral device driver installer
    US-6321337-B1November 20, 2001Sanctum Ltd.Method and system for protecting operations of trusted internal networks
    US-5838920-ANovember 17, 1998Advanced System Technologies, Inc.Method and apparatus for identifying transactions
    US-2002026531-A1February 28, 2002John Keane, Brutman Neil R., Harris Michael J., Christopher MaceyMethods and systems for enabling communication between a processor and a network operations center
    US-6614800-B1September 02, 2003International Business Machines CorporationMethod and system for virtual private network administration channels
    US-6888927-B1May 03, 2005Nortel Networks LimitedGraphical message notification
    US-2002016827-A1February 07, 2002Mccabe Ron, Tracy Camp, Card Stuart W., Schroeder David J.Flexible remote data mirroring
    US-6101543-AAugust 08, 2000Digital Equipment CorporationPseudo network adapter for frame capture, encapsulation and encryption
    US-5893150-AApril 06, 1999Sun Microsystems, Inc.Efficient allocation of cache memory space in a computer system
    EP-0436365-B1May 27, 1998Digital Equipment CorporationVerfahren und System zur Sicherung von Datenendgeräten
    US-6023724-AFebruary 08, 20003Com CorporationApparatus and methods for use therein for an ISDN LAN modem that displays fault information to local hosts through interception of host DNS request messages
    US-2002107989-A1August 08, 2002Johnson Scott C., Bailey Brian W., Canion Rodney S., Garvens Thomas E., Jackson Gregory J., Richter Roger K.Network endpoint system with accelerated data path
    US-2003229718-A1December 11, 2003Neoteris, Inc.Method and system for providing secure access to private networks
    US-2007245409-A1October 18, 2007James Harris, Max He, Arkesh Kumar, Ajay Soni, Charu Venkatraman, Shashi Najundaswamy, Amarnath MullickSystems and Methods for Providing Levels of Access and Action Control Via an SSL VPN Appliance
    US-2006129689-A1June 15, 2006Ricky Ho, Tefcros Anthias, Raghavan Kollivakkam R, Chan Alex YReducing the sizes of application layer messages in a network element
    US-2002049841-A1April 25, 2002Johnson Scott C, Fernander Robert B, Hartsell Neal D, Jackson Gregory J, Qiu Chaoxin C, Richter Roger KSystems and methods for providing differentiated service in information management environments
    US-6173325-B2December 31, 1969
    US-6363363-B1March 26, 2002Verifone, Inc.System, method and article of manufacture for managing transactions in a high availability system
    US-2003014623-A1January 16, 2003Michael Freed, Elango Gannesen, Praveen PatnalaSecure sockets layer cut through architecture
    US-2002133593-A1September 19, 2002Johnson Scott C., Conrad Mark J., Richter Roger K.Systems and methods for the deterministic management of information
    US-6550012-B1April 15, 2003Network Associates, Inc.Active firewall system and methodology
    US-5519699-AMay 21, 1996Nec CorporationMethod of protocol termination and a packet data communication system applied the method
    US-7120690-B1October 10, 2006Emc CorporationManaging a distributed directory database
    US-2005185647-A1August 25, 2005Rao Goutham P., Robert Rodriguez, Eric BrueggemannSystem, apparatus and method for establishing a secured communications link to form a virtual private network at a network protocol layer other than at which packets are filtered
    US-2004190092-A1September 30, 2004Kia Silverbrook, Paul Lapstun, Jan Rusman, Henderson Peter Charles Boyd, Alireza Moini, Yourlo Zhenya Alexander, Underwood Matthew John, Ridley Nicholas DamonScanning device for coded data
    US-7260617-B2August 21, 2007International Business Machines CorporationMethod, system, and article of manufacture for implementing security features at a portal server
    US-2002161908-A1October 31, 2002Benitez Manuel Enrique, Holler Anne Marie, Shah Lacky Vasant, Arai Daniel Takeo, Sameer PanwarIntelligent network streaming and execution system for conventionally coded applications
    US-7130792-B2October 31, 2006Iis Inc.Method for offering multilingual information translated in many languages through a communication network
    US-7328267-B1February 05, 2008Cisco Technology, Inc.TCP proxy connection management in a gigabit environment
    US-7086728-B2August 08, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrint engine with a printhead assembly arranged within a media tray assembly
    US-2005080850-A1April 14, 2005Pixion, Inc.Real-time, multi-point, multi-speed, multi-stream scalable computer network communications system
    US-2006015570-A1January 19, 2006Netscaler, Inc.Method and device for performing integrated caching in a data communication network
    US-7522581-B2April 21, 2009International Business Machines CorporationOverload protection for SIP servers
    US-6058250-AMay 02, 2000At&T CorpBifurcated transaction system in which nonsensitive information is exchanged using a public network connection and sensitive information is exchanged after automatically configuring a private network connection
    US-6590588-B2July 08, 2003Palm, Inc.Wireless, radio-frequency communications using a handheld computer
    US-7043529-B1May 09, 2006The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyCollaborative development network for widely dispersed users and methods therefor
    US-7036142-B1April 25, 2006Cisco Technology, Inc.Single step network logon based on point to point protocol
    US-7114180-B1September 26, 2006F5 Networks, Inc.Method and system for authenticating and authorizing requestors interacting with content servers
    US-6935736-B2August 30, 2005Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinthead assembly arranged within a media tray assembly
    US-6301249-B1October 09, 2001Opuswave Networks, IncEfficient error control for wireless packet transmissions
    US-6904449-B1June 07, 2005Accenture LlpSystem and method for an application provider framework
    US-6601057-B1July 29, 2003Decentrix Inc.Method and apparatus for generating and modifying multiple instances of an element of a web site
    US-6427132-B1July 30, 2002Accenture LlpSystem, method and article of manufacture for demonstrating E-commerce capabilities via a simulation on a network
    US-6327242-B1December 04, 2001Infolibria, Inc.Message redirector with cut-through switch for highly reliable and efficient network traffic processor deployment
    US-6636242-B2October 21, 2003Accenture LlpView configurer in a presentation services patterns environment
    US-2001030970-A1October 18, 2001Santa Wiryaman, Vladimir Sukonnik, David RomrellIntegrated access point network device
    US-6553377-B1April 22, 2003Network Associates, Inc.System and process for maintaining a plurality of remote security applications using a modular framework in a distributed computing environment
    US-5987611-ANovember 16, 1999Zone Labs, Inc.System and methodology for managing internet access on a per application basis for client computers connected to the internet
    US-2007169179-A1July 19, 2007Intel CorporationTightly coupled scalar and boolean processor
    US-6182139-B1January 30, 2001Resonate Inc.Client-side resource-based load-balancing with delayed-resource-binding using TCP state migration to WWW server farm
    US-2003198189-A1October 23, 2003Dave Roberts, Hansell Jeffrey Stuart, Shekokar Praveen GhanashyamNetwork system having an instructional sequence for performing packet processing and optimizing the packet processing
    US-2004111519-A1June 10, 2004Guangrui Fu, Daichi Funato, Toshiro Kawahara, Jonathan WoodAccess network dynamic firewall
    US-2003152028-A1August 14, 2003Vilho Raisanen, Marko Suoknuuti, Pekka PessiMethod and system for managing quality of service by feeding information into the packet network
    US-6715145-B1March 30, 2004Accenture LlpProcessing pipeline in a base services pattern environment
    US-2003182431-A1September 25, 2003Emil Sturniolo, Aaron Stavens, Savarese Joseph T.Method and apparatus for providing secure connectivity in mobile and other intermittent computing environments
    US-2003200353-A1October 23, 2003Vikas Dogra, Verma Manoj K., Sanjay Wangoo, Gijare Ashutosh S., George KoppichBrowser-implemented upload/download of a driver
    US-7433314-B2October 07, 2008Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Method and system for acknowledging the receipt of a transmitted data stream in a wireless personal area network
    US-2004010621-A1January 15, 2004Afergan Michael M., Charisma Schlossberg, Hong Duke P., Rao Satish BalusuMethod for caching and delivery of compressed content in a content delivery network
    US-5881229-AMarch 09, 1999Shiva CorporationMethod and product for enchancing performance of computer networks including shared storage objects
    US-2001052016-A1December 13, 2001Skene Bryan D., Tennican Scott P., Kee Thomas E.Method and system for balancing load distrubution on a wide area network
    US-2010241846-A1September 23, 2010Prabakar Sundarrajan, Junxiao He, Ajay Soni, Shashidhara Nanjundaswamy, Arkesh KumarSystem and method for establishing a virtual private network
    US-6289382-B1September 11, 2001Andersen Consulting, LlpSystem, method and article of manufacture for a globally addressable interface in a communication services patterns environment
    US-2006225130-A1October 05, 2006Kai Chen, Shioupyn ShenSecure login credentials for substantially anonymous users
    US-2004006708-A1January 08, 2004Lucent Technologies Inc.Method and apparatus for enabling peer-to-peer virtual private network (P2P-VPN) services in VPN-enabled network
    US-6324647-B1November 27, 2001Michel K. Bowman-AmuahSystem, method and article of manufacture for security management in a development architecture framework
    US-6321235-B1November 20, 2001International Business Machines CorporationGlobal caching and sharing of SQL statements in a heterogeneous application environment
    US-2005265353-A1December 01, 2005Somenath Sengupta, Nirwan AnsariSub-segment based transport layer protocol for wireless medium
    US-7051316-B2May 23, 2006Borland Software CorporationDistributed computing component system with diagrammatic graphical representation of code with separate delineated display area by type
    US-7070110-B2July 04, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdHand-wearable coded data reader
    US-5742829-AApril 21, 1998Microsoft CorporationAutomatic software installation on heterogeneous networked client computer systems
    WO-2008112691-A2September 18, 2008Citrix Systems, Inc.Systèmes et procédés pour assurer un débordement dynamique de serveurs virtuels à partir de la bande passante
    US-7221660-B1May 22, 2007E.F. Johnson CompanySystem and method for multicast communications using real time transport protocol (RTP)
    US-7128270-B2October 31, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdScanning device for coded data
    US-2005132060-A1June 16, 2005Richard Mo, Bishop James W.Jr., Sandra AuSystems and methods for preventing spam and denial of service attacks in messaging, packet multimedia, and other networks
    US-7609721-B2October 27, 2009Citrix Systems, Inc.Systems and methods for adjusting the maximum transmission unit for encrypted communications
    US-6701514-B1March 02, 2004Accenture LlpSystem, method, and article of manufacture for test maintenance in an automated scripting framework
    US-7051161-B2May 23, 2006Nokia CorporationMemory admission control based on object size or request frequency
    US-6980962-B1December 27, 2005Quixtar Investments, Inc.Electronic commerce transactions within a marketing system that may contain a membership buying opportunity
    US-2003065763-A1April 03, 2003Swildens Eric Sven-Johan, Day Richard David, Gupta Ajit K.Method for determining metrics of a content delivery and global traffic management network
    US-7144095-B2December 05, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInkjet printer incorporating an ink transfer roller
    US-7284044-B2October 16, 2007Seiko Epson CorporationNetwork technique for troubleshooting
    US-6766373-B1July 20, 2004International Business Machines CorporationDynamic, seamless switching of a network session from one connection route to another
    US-7197751-B2March 27, 2007Oracle International Corp.Real-time collaboration client
    US-2004078621-A1April 22, 2004Cosine Communications, Inc.System and method for virtual router failover in a network routing system
    US-2006034283-A1February 16, 2006Ko Michael A, Recio Renato J, Prasenjit SarkarMethod and system for providing direct data placement support
    US-2002007404-A1January 17, 2002Mark Vange, Marc Plumb, Marco ClementoniSystem and method for network caching
    US-2003084162-A1May 01, 2003Johnson Bruce L., Anderson Bradley J.Managing peer-to-peer access to a device behind a firewall
    US-2002059274-A1May 16, 2002Hartsell Neal D., Fernander Robert B., Jackson Gregory J., Johnson Scott C., Qiu Chaoxin C., Richter Roger K.Systems and methods for configuration of information management systems
    US-2002138618-A1September 26, 2002F5 Networks, Inc.Simplified method for processing multiple connections from the same client
    US-7363347-B2April 22, 2008Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method and system for reestablishing connection information on a switch connected to plural servers in a computer network
    US-2002083183-A1June 27, 2002Sanjay Pujare, Robert Deuel, Nicholas Ryan, Manuel Benitez, David LinConventionally coded application conversion system for streamed delivery and execution
    US-7152047-B1December 19, 2006Esecure.Biz, Inc.System and method for production and authentication of original documents
    US-6434628-B1August 13, 2002Accenture LlpCommon interface for handling exception interface name with additional prefix and suffix for handling exceptions in environment services patterns
    US-7097106-B2August 29, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdHandheld laser scanner
    US-2003055962-A1March 20, 2003Freund Gregor P., Haycock Keith A., Herrmann Conrad K.System providing internet access management with router-based policy enforcement
    US-7096009-B2August 22, 2006Research In Motion LimitedAdvanced voice and data operations in a mobile data communication device
    US-2009133015-A1May 21, 2009Canon Kabushiki KaishaDriver management apparatus and method therefor
    US-2007156852-A1July 05, 2007Prabakar Sundarrajan, Prakash Khemani, Kailash Kailash, Ajay Soni, Rajiv Sinha, Saravana Annamalaisami, Bharat Bhushan K RSystem and method for performing flash crowd caching of dynamically generated objects in a data communication network
    US-2005044350-A1February 24, 2005Eric White, Patrick TurleySystem and method for providing a secure connection between networked computers
    US-6742015-B1May 25, 2004Accenture LlpBase services patterns in a netcentric environment
    US-7191252-B2March 13, 2007Digital Doors, Inc.Data security system and method adjunct to e-mail, browser or telecom program
    US-7149897-B2December 12, 2006The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavySystems and methods for providing increased computer security
    US-5307413-AApril 26, 1994Process Software CorporationMethod and apparatus for adding data compression and other services in a computer network
    US-7260840-B2August 21, 2007Microsoft CorporationMulti-layer based method for implementing network firewalls
    US-2008225748-A1September 18, 2008Prakash Khemani, Vishal BandekarSystems and methods for providing stuctured policy expressions to represent unstructured data in a network appliance
    US-7072665-B1July 04, 2006Blumberg Brad W, Blumberg Eric MPosition-based information access device and method of searching
    US-2002107971-A1August 08, 2002Bailey Brian W., Richter Roger K., Ho WangNetwork transport accelerator
    US-7128265-B2October 31, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdOrientation determination
    US-2001047406-A1November 29, 2001Netilla Networks Inc.Apparatus and accompanying methods for providing, through a centralized server site, an integrated virtual office environment, remotely accessible via a network-connected web browser, with remote network monitoring and management capabilities
    US-6026440-AFebruary 15, 2000International Business Machines CorporationWeb server account manager plug-in for monitoring resources
    US-6701345-B1March 02, 2004Accenture LlpProviding a notification when a plurality of users are altering similar data in a health care solution environment
    US-7150398-B2December 19, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdMulti-angle laser scanner
    US-7207483-B2April 24, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdShopping receptacle with in-built user interface
    US-6606663-B1August 12, 2003Openwave Systems Inc.Method and apparatus for caching credentials in proxy servers for wireless user agents
    US-2005025150-A1February 03, 2005Itworx EgyptAccelerating network performance by striping and parallelization of TCP connections
    US-7246233-B2July 17, 2007International Business Machines CorporationPolicy-driven kernel-based security implementation
    US-7054837-B2May 30, 2006Restaurant Services, Inc.System, method and computer program product for utilizing market demand information for generating revenue
    US-6700902-B1March 02, 2004Elster Electricity, LlcMethod and system for improving wireless data packet delivery
    US-6449695-B1September 10, 2002Microsoft CorporationData cache using plural lists to indicate sequence of data storage
    US-2001037387-A1November 01, 2001F5 Networks, Inc.,Method and system for optimizing a network by independently scaling control segments and data flow
    US-7136645-B2November 14, 2006Netmotion Wireless, Inc.Method and apparatus for providing mobile and other intermittent connectivity in a computing environment
    US-7107285-B2September 12, 2006Questerra CorporationMethod, system, and program for an improved enterprise spatial system
    US-2002099940-A1July 25, 2002Jieh-Shan WangSecure internet applications with mobile code
    US-2002023210-A1February 21, 2002Mark Tuomenoksa, Samuel Bendinelli, Jerold Francus, Jonathan Harwood, Michael Herrick, John Keane, Christopher Macey, Brion ShimamotoMethod and system for managing and configuring virtual private networks
    US-2003123481-A1July 03, 2003Ems Technologies, Inc.Enhancements for TCP performance enhancing proxies
    US-6334664-B1January 01, 2002Silverbrook Research Pty LtdCapping a printhead against a transfer roller
    US-2007179955-A1August 02, 2007Citrix Systems, Inc.Methods and systems for providing authorized remote access to a computing environment provided by a virtual machine
    US-2002108059-A1August 08, 2002Canion Rodney S., Bailey Brian W., Garvens Thomas E., Johnson Scott C., Richter Roger K., Ho WangNetwork security accelerator
    US-2003061505-A1March 27, 2003Todd Sperry, Sivakumar Munnangi, Shridhar MukundSystems and methods for implementing host-based security in a computer network
    US-2002105972-A1August 08, 2002Richter Roger K., Bailey Brian W., Canion Rodney S., Garvens Thomas E., Jackson Gregory J., Johnson Scott C., Webb Theodore S.Interprocess communications within a network node using switch fabric
    US-2005259634-A1November 24, 2005Ross Perry RMethod and apparatus for low-overhead service availability and performance monitoring
    US-2004003101-A1January 01, 2004Roth David J., Oliveira Eduardo P., Klemets Anders E.Caching control for streaming media
    US-2007206621-A1September 06, 2007Robert Plamondon, Michael Ovsiannikov, Allen SamuelsSystems and methods of using packet boundaries for reduction in timeout prevention
    US-2004260922-A1December 23, 2004Goodman Joshua T., Rounthwaite Robert L., Hulten Geoffrey J., Yih Wen-TauTraining filters for IP address and URL learning
    US-2005005014-A1January 06, 2005John Holmes, Miller David Michael, Vonkock WalterTransport system for instant messaging
    US-2003223418-A1December 04, 2003Sachin Desai, Tim Millet, Zahid Hussain, Paul Kim, Louise Yeung, Ken YeungNetwork packet steering
    WO-2006020823-A1February 23, 2006Citrix Systems, Inc.A method for maintaining transaction integrity across multiple remote access servers
    US-7139999-B2November 21, 2006Accenture LlpDevelopment architecture framework
    US-7028333-B2April 11, 2006Corente, Inc.Methods and systems for partners in virtual networks
    US-2004268358-A1December 30, 2004Microsoft CorporationNetwork load balancing with host status information
    US-5511208-AApril 23, 1996International Business Machines CorporationLocating resources in computer networks having cache server nodes
    US-4701844-AOctober 20, 1987Motorola Computer Systems, Inc.Dual cache for independent prefetch and execution units
    US-6324525-B1November 27, 2001Hewlett-Packard CompanySettlement of aggregated electronic transactions over a network
    US-6523027-B1February 18, 2003Accenture LlpInterfacing servers in a Java based e-commerce architecture
    US-7263071-B2August 28, 2007Seiko Epson CorporationConnectionless TCP/IP data exchange
    US-7072965-B2July 04, 2006Fujitsu LimitedCommunication distribution controlling method and apparatus having improved response performance
    US-6487641-B1November 26, 2002Oracle CorporationDynamic caches with miss tables
    US-2003226018-A1December 04, 2003Broadcom CorporationData transfer efficiency in a cryptography accelerator system
    US-2003165138-A1September 04, 2003Swonk Glenn L, Marston Andrew John, Mccloskey AndrewVirtual switch in a wide area network
    US-2003009538-A1January 09, 2003Shah Lacky Vasant, Sridhar RamakrishnanNetwork caching system for streamed applications
    US-2002196279-A1December 26, 2002Marc Bloomfield, Jeff Muir, Anatoliy PanasyukInteracting with software applications displayed in a web page
    US-2003033520-A1February 13, 2003Christopher Peiffer, L'heureux IsraelHTTP multiplexor/demultiplexor system for use in secure transactions
    US-6282172-B1August 28, 2001Yipes Communications, Inc.Generating acknowledgement signals in a data communication system
    US-2003014628-A1January 16, 2003Michael Freed, Elango GanesenSecure sockets layer proxy architecture
    US-6944279-B2September 13, 2005Metro One Telecommunications, Inc.Enhanced directory assistance service providing individual or group directories
    US-6389505-B1May 14, 2002International Business Machines CorporationRestore tracking system for DRAM
    US-6061715-AMay 09, 2000Xerox CorporationApparatus and method for loading and reloading HTML pages having cacheable and non-cacheable portions
    US-2005013280-A1January 20, 2005Buddhikot Milind M., Adiseshu Hari, Miller Scott C., Singh Kundan NarendraMethod and system for mobility across heterogeneous address spaces
    US-2006005240-A1January 05, 2006Prabakar Sundarrajan, Junxiao He, Ajay Soni, Shashidhara Nanjundaswamy, Arkesh KumarSystem and method for establishing a virtual private network
    US-2005021762-A1January 27, 2005Microsoft CorporationMethod of operation of an intelligent transpartent gateway during an FTP session
    US-2006053164-A1March 09, 2006Teracruz, Inc.Application-layer monitoring of communication between one or more database clients and one or more database servers
    US-2006271652-A1November 30, 2006Nicholas Stavrakos, Chris KoopmansMethod for dynamic bearer aware
    US-2006053253-A1March 09, 2006Microsoft CorporationCaching control for streaming media
    US-2002055966-A1May 09, 2002John Border, Douglas Dillon, Matthew ButehornSystem and method for reading ahead of content
    US-6584569-B2June 24, 2003Sanctum Ltd.System for determining web application vulnerabilities
    US-2006245414-A1November 02, 2006Neoaccel, Inc.System, method and computer program product for communicating with a private network
    US-2005149481-A1July 07, 2005Lambertus Hesselink, Dharmarus Rizal, Bjornson Eric S.Managed peer-to-peer applications, systems and methods for distributed data access and storage
    US-2001049717-A1December 06, 2001Freeman Thomas D., Pedersen Bradley JayMethod and apparatus for communicating among a network of servers
    US-5623492-AApril 22, 1997U S West Technologies, Inc.Methods and systems for managing bandwidth resources in a fast packet switching network
    US-2002098840-A1July 25, 2002Hanson Aaron D., Sturniolo Emil A., Anatoly Menn, Olson Erik D., Savarese Joseph T.Method and apparatus for providing mobile and other intermittent connectivity in a computing environment
    US-2005031058-A1February 10, 2005Soong Anthony C.K., David Purdy, Larry FlowersMethod and apparatus for automatic gain control of a wireless receiver
    US-2005147126-A1July 07, 2005Jack Qiu, Jonathan LeeMethod and system for transmission control packet (TCP) segmentation offload
    US-2008225720-A1September 18, 2008Prakash Khemani, Vishal BandekarSystems and methods for configuring flow control of policy expressions
    EP-1432209-B1May 06, 2009Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Verfahren und Architektur für eine Client-Sitzung Failover
    US-6662357-B1December 09, 2003Accenture LlpManaging information in an integrated development architecture framework
    US-6732269-B1May 04, 2004International Business Machines CorporationMethods, systems and computer program products for enhanced security identity utilizing an SSL proxy
    US-6141686-AOctober 31, 2000Deterministic Networks, Inc.Client-side application-classifier gathering network-traffic statistics and application and user names using extensible-service provider plugin for policy-based network control
    US-6256773-B1July 03, 2001Accenture LlpSystem, method and article of manufacture for configuration management in a development architecture framework
    US-5999525-ADecember 07, 1999Mci Communications CorporationMethod for video telephony over a hybrid network
    US-2002042875-A1April 11, 2002Jayant ShuklaMethod and apparatus for end-to-end secure data communication
    US-2003046586-A1March 06, 2003Satyam Bheemarasetti, Chandra PrathuriSecure remote access to data between peers
    US-2003105604-A1June 05, 2003Ash Leslie E., Wiebel Michael F., Elven Darren R., Burton Christopher L., Lee Ryan P.B., Michael ThomasReal-time streaming media measurement system and method
    US-2002007402-A1January 17, 2002Thomas Huston Arthur Charles, Haines Matthew Dennis, Abbott Freeland Knight, Beguelin Adam Louis, Chowla Michael AlexanderApproach for managing and providing content to users
    US-7007103-B2February 28, 2006Microsoft CorporationMethod to offload a network stack
    US-2006059370-A1March 16, 2006Asnis James D, Lehtonen Teemu S, Olev KartauArchitecture for routing and IPSec integration
    EP-1045553-B1January 11, 2006Nortel Networks LimitedPrivate virtuelle Netze und Verfahren zu deren Betrieb
    US-2003174718-A1September 18, 2003Broadcom CorporationScalable packet filter for a network device
    US-2003236837-A1December 25, 2003Johnson Scott C., Bailey Brian W., Canion Rodney S., Garvens Thomas E., Jackson Gregory J., Richter Roger K.Content delivery system providing accelerate content delivery
    US-2004203296-A1October 14, 2004Globespan Virata Inc.Method and system for attaching a USB network adapter supporting both RNDIS and non-RNDIS capable operating systems
    US-2005286466-A1December 29, 2005Tagg James P, Mcewan Andrew DSystem for providing mobile VoIP
    US-2002199007-A1December 26, 2002Tom Clayton, Rakes Richard BruceVirtual private network software system
    US-2002069278-A1June 06, 2002Forsloew JanNetwork-based mobile workgroup system
    US-2005223412-A1October 06, 2005International Business Machines CorporationContext-sensitive confidentiality within federated environments
    US-2008225753-A1September 18, 2008Prakash Khemani, Vishal BandekarSystems and methods for configuring handling of undefined policy events
    US-2003088698-A1May 08, 2003Inderpreet Singh, Mccann BenjaminVPN failure recovery
    US-7113779-B1September 26, 2006Iwao FujisakiCarrier
    US-2005256923-A1November 17, 2005Citrix Systems, Inc.Methods and apparatus for displaying application output on devices having constrained system resources
    US-2003037108-A1February 20, 2003Christopher Peiffer, L'heureux IsraelSystem and method for maintaining statefulness during client-server interactions
    US-6792615-B1September 14, 2004New Horizons Telecasting, Inc.Encapsulated, streaming media automation and distribution system
    US-2002065919-A1May 30, 2002Taylor Ian Lance, David Henkel-Wallace, Jason ThorpePeer-to-peer caching network for user data
    US-7085854-B2August 01, 2006Corente, Inc.Methods and systems for enabling communication between a processor and a network operations center
    US-6847892-B2January 25, 2005Digital Angel CorporationSystem for localizing and sensing objects and providing alerts
    US-6272148-B1August 07, 2001Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaScheme for reliable communications via radio and wire networks using transport layer connection
    US-7096495-B1August 22, 2006Intel CorporationNetwork session management
    US-2003088788-A1May 08, 2003Xuechen YangSystem and method for managing dynamic network sessions
    US-2004215746-A1October 28, 2004Nbt Technology, Inc.Transparent client-server transaction accelerator
    US-7178719-B2February 20, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdFacilitating user interaction
    US-2005122980-A1June 09, 2005Microsoft CorporationMethod and computer program product for offloading processing tasks from software to hardware
    US-2005080907-A1April 14, 2005Anatoliy Panasyuk, Pedersen Bradley J., David Stone, Terry TrederEncapsulating protocol for session persistence and reliability
    US-2004010601-A1January 15, 2004Afergan Michael M., Ellis Andrew B., Ravi Sundaram, Rahul Hariharan S.Method and system for protecting web sites from public internet threats
    EP-1427133-B1April 01, 2015Broadcom CorporationSystème, procédé et appareil de traitement de sécurité de paquets de données
    US-6415329-B1July 02, 2002Massachusetts Institute Of TechnologyMethod and apparatus for improving efficiency of TCP/IP protocol over high delay-bandwidth network
    US-2002147795-A1October 10, 2002Charles E. CantwellNetwork peripheral device driver installer
    US-2002087729-A1July 04, 2002Edgar David A.System, method and computer program product for optimization and acceleration of data transport and processing
    US-2002035596-A1March 21, 2002Ruiguo Yang, Henry CollinsRemote control of a client's off-screen surface
    US-2001043600-A1November 22, 2001Chatterjee Aditya N., Nelson Richard C., Anand Jagannathan, Bowers Steven R., Rodrigues Roberto G., Kadrichu Hanny P., Yaron Reshef, Alan SchneiderSystem and method for internet page acceleration including multicast transmissions
    US-2005232298-A1October 20, 2005Beverly Harlan T, Shah Hemal VEarly direct memory access in network communications
    US-2005058112-A1March 17, 2005Sony Corporation, Sony Electronics IncMethod of and apparatus for adaptively managing connectivity for mobile devices through available interfaces
    US-6732314-B1May 04, 20043Com CorporationMethod and apparatus for L2TP forward error correction
    US-7216173-B2May 08, 2007Varian Medical Systems Technologies, Inc.Virtual private network software system
    US-6438127-B1August 20, 2002Mannesmann AgProcess and apparatus for the operation of virtual private networks on a common data packet communication network
    US-2004034794-A1February 19, 2004Yaron Mayer, Zak DechovichSystem and method for comprehensive general generic protection for computers against malicious programs that may steal information and/or cause damages
    US-6894981-B1May 17, 2005Cisco Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for transparently proxying a connection
    US-6904519-B2June 07, 2005Microsoft CorporationMethod and computer program product for offloading processing tasks from software to hardware
    US-2004034744-A1February 19, 2004Magnus Karlsson, Mallik MahalingamDelay cache method and apparatus
    US-2004177158-A1September 09, 2004Bauch David James, Ryd Warren DavidNetwork address translation techniques for selective network traffic diversion
    US-7140044-B2November 21, 2006Digital Doors, Inc.Data security system and method for separation of user communities
    US-6128627-AOctober 03, 2000Inktomi CorporationConsistent data storage in an object cache
    US-6735691-B1May 11, 2004Microsoft CorporationSystem and method for the automated migration of configuration information
    US-2004162876-A1August 19, 2004Whale Communications Ltd.System and method for providing conditional access to server-based applications from remote access devices
    US-2002138572-A1September 26, 2002Delany Shawn P., Sajeed AhmedDetermining a user's groups
    US-2004146053-A1July 29, 2004Itworx EgyptArchitecture for efficient utilization and optimum performance of a network
    US-7222305-B2May 22, 2007Oracle International Corp.Method of sharing a desktop with attendees of a real-time collaboration
    US-6477580-B1November 05, 2002Accenture LlpSelf-described stream in a communication services patterns environment
    US-2007233910-A1October 04, 2007Sandisk Il Ltd.Data Storage Device With Full Access By All Users
    US-7464264-B2December 09, 2008Microsoft CorporationTraining filters for detecting spasm based on IP addresses and text-related features
    US-7117530-B1October 03, 2006Watchguard Technologies, Inc.Tunnel designation system for virtual private networks
    US-6618359-B1September 09, 2003Nortel Networks LimitedError recovery in a mixed protocol networks
    US-7135991-B2November 14, 2006Bellsouth Intellectual PropertyAutomated parking director systems and related methods
    US-6959320-B2October 25, 2005Endeavors Technology, Inc.Client-side performance optimization system for streamed applications
    US-6996628-B2February 07, 2006Corente, Inc.Methods and systems for managing virtual addresses for virtual networks
    US-2002035451-A1March 21, 2002Todd RothermelSpatail data enabled engineering, construction, and operations computer-aided design (CAD) project system, method and computer program product
    US-2003182423-A1September 25, 2003Magnifier Networks (Israel) Ltd.Virtual host acceleration system
    US-7496659-B1February 24, 2009Cisco Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for monitoring the availability of network resources
    US-6363478-B1March 26, 2002International Business Machines Corp.Security mechanisms in a web server
    US-2004213248-A1October 28, 2004Masato Okuda, Jun Tanaka, Michio Kusayanagi, Kazuto NishimuraMethod and apparatus for transmitting a cell and a packet in a network
    US-2008049786-A1February 28, 2008Maruthi Ram, Josephine Suganthi, Sergey Verzunov, Sandeep KamathSystems and Methods for Providing Dynamic Spillover of Virtual Servers Based on Bandwidth
    US-2005177866-A1August 11, 2005Kirsch Steven T.Method and system for acceleration of secure socket layer transactions in a network
    US-7222152-B1May 22, 2007Microsoft CorporationGeneric communications framework
    US-2003154110-A1August 14, 2003Ervin Walter, Andy Giesler, Chris TheorinMethod and apparatus for wireless access to a health care information system
    US-2005108412-A1May 19, 2005Mark Sjollema, Greg OdomData translation architecture
    US-2003079031-A1April 24, 2003Motohiko NaganoCommunication processing apparatus, communication processing method, and computer program
    WO-2008112698-A2September 18, 2008Citrix Systems, Inc.Systèmes et procédés pour assurer un équilibrage de charge de serveur global de dispositifs hétérogènes
    US-2003123394-A1July 03, 2003Ems Technologies, Inc.Flow control between performance enhancing proxies over variable bandwidth split links
    US-2006123477-A1June 08, 2006Kollivakkam Raghavan, Tefcros Anthias, Oleson Parley V, Sunil Potti, Raj De Datta, Stephen ChoMethod and apparatus for generating a network topology representation based on inspection of application messages at a network device
    US-2003051102-A1March 13, 2003Jacobs Dean Bernard, Rob Woollen, Seth WhiteSystem and method for flushing bean cache
    US-7055947-B2June 06, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinthead-transfer roller arrangement
    US-2002194382-A1December 19, 2002Kausik Balas Natarajan, Janardhanan JawaharMethod and system for efficient and automated version management of embedded objects in web documents
    US-2002091788-A1July 11, 2002Youdecide.Com, Inc.Internet web server cache storage and session management system
    US-2003067874-A1April 10, 2003See Michael B., David Morgan, Stephen Clawson, Goodwin L. MicheleCentral policy based traffic management
    US-5918244-AJune 29, 1999Eec Systems, Inc.Method and system for coherently caching I/O devices across a network
    US-2003023767-A1January 30, 2003Brabson Roy Frank, Huynh Lap ThietMethods, systems and computer program products for kernel based transaction processing
    US-2002032725-A1March 14, 2002Netilla Networks Inc.Apparatus and accompanying methods for providing, through a centralized server site, an integrated virtual office environment, remotely accessible via a network-connected web browser, with remote network monitoring and management capabilities
    US-2002101860-A1August 01, 2002Thornton Timothy R., Rajiv Bhatia, Suh Ki Choon, Cheng ChenApplication for a voice over IP (VoIP) telephony gateway and methods for use therein
    US-7024452-B1April 04, 2006Vignette CorporationMethod and system for file-system based caching
    US-6332163-B1December 18, 2001Accenture, LlpMethod for providing communication services over a computer network system
    US-4479195-AOctober 23, 1984At&T Bell LaboratoriesData conference system
    CN-1394042-AJanuary 29, 2003华为技术有限公司在虚拟私有网的隧道虚接口上保证互联网协议安全的方法
    EP-1134942-A1September 19, 2001Telefonaktiebolaget Lm EricssonMethod and arrangement for control of non real-time application flows
    US-2002101848-A1August 01, 2002Ivan Lee, Li Cheng Zai, Max Rible, Pabst William G.Systems and methods for on-location, wireless access of web content
    US-7013290-B2March 14, 2006John Allen AnanianPersonalized interactive digital catalog profiling
    US-7035427-B2April 25, 2006Digimarc CorporationMethod and system for managing, accessing and paying for the use of copyrighted electronic media
    US-5852717-ADecember 22, 1998Shiva CorporationPerformance optimizations for computer networks utilizing HTTP
    US-2002116582-A1August 22, 2002Copeland George P., Conner Michael H., Flurry Gregory A.Batching of invalidations and new values in a web cache with dynamic content
    US-2002138511-A1September 26, 2002Konstantinos Psounis, Janardhanan JawaharMethod and system for class-based management of dynamic content in a networked environment
    US-2002073061-A1June 13, 2002Henry CollinsMethod and system for efficiently reducing graphical display data for transmission over a low bandwidth transport protocol mechanism
    US-7404003-B1July 22, 2008Data Expedition, Inc.Method and apparatus for client side state management
    US-7039708-B1May 02, 2006International Business Machines CorporationApparatus and method for establishing communication in a computer network
    US-6899420-B2May 31, 2005Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinting system with compact print engine
    US-2003018891-A1January 23, 2003Rick Hall, Mitchell Oscar R.Encrypted packet inspection
    US-2003236861-A1December 25, 2003Johnson Scott C., Bailey Brian W., Canion Rodney S., Garvens Thomas E., Jackson Gregory J.Network content delivery system with peer to peer processing components
    US-2004103225-A1May 27, 2004Intel CorporationEmbedded transport acceleration architecture
    US-7143153-B1November 28, 2006Ciena CorporationInternal network device dynamic health monitoring
    US-2003039354-A1February 27, 2003Kimble David E., Mitsuru Shimada, Navin ChanderFIFO architecture with in-place cryptographic service
    US-2005198532-A1September 08, 2005Fatih Comlekoglu, Gilbert Thomas A.Thin client end system for virtual private network
    US-2004031058-A1February 12, 2004Richard ReismanMethod and apparatus for browsing using alternative linkbases
    US-2005108517-A1May 19, 2005Doug Dillon, Ricardo Belmar, Seejo SebastinePre-fetching secure content using proxy architecture
    US-2002095400-A1July 18, 2002Johnson Scott C, Fernander Robert B, Hartsell Neal D, Jackson Gregory J, Qiu Chaoxin C, Richter Roger KSystems and methods for managing differentiated service in information management environments
    US-2003212760-A1November 13, 2003Zheng Chen, Xiaoming Sun, Liu WenyinUser Intention modeling for Web navigation
    US-6611522-B1August 26, 2003Juniper Networks, Inc.Quality of service facility in a device for performing IP forwarding and ATM switching
    US-2003093566-A1May 15, 2003Jardin Cary A.System and method for network and application transparent database acceleration
    US-7200804-B1April 03, 2007Yodlee.Com, Inc.Method and apparatus for providing automation to an internet navigation application
    US-2003236919-A1December 25, 2003Johnson Scott C., Bailey Brian W., Canion Rodney S., Garvens Thomas E., Jackson Gregory J., Richter Roger K.Network connected computing system
    US-2003191812-A1October 09, 2003International Business Machines CorporationMethod and system for caching role-specific fragments
    US-2003014625-A1January 16, 2003Michael Freed, Elango Gannesen, Arun MoorthyBufferless secure sockets layer architecture
    US-7480312-B2January 20, 2009Tehuti Networks Ltd.Network traffic accelerator system and method
    US-2002184224-A1December 05, 2002Hyperspace Communications, Inc.File transfer system
    US-2002095498-A1July 18, 2002Accordion NetworksNetwork architecture for multi-client units
    US-2008071915-A1March 20, 2008Microsoft CorporationApplication programming interface and generalized network address translation for translation of transport layer sessions
    US-6918113-B2July 12, 2005Endeavors Technology, Inc.Client installation and execution system for streamed applications
    US-2002120743-A1August 29, 2002Lior Shabtay, Dan Beiser, Ofir Friedman, Eyal Amitai, Guy KronentalSplicing persistent connections
    US-2003236831-A1December 25, 2003Eastman Kodak CompanyMethod and system for setting up a system for sharing images over a communication network between multiple users
    US-2004215665-A1October 28, 2004Edgar David A., Nelson Adam J.System, method, and computer program product for providing accelerated and secure wireless data transmission over the internet
    US-7137566-B2November 21, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdProduct identity data
    US-2003167403-A1September 04, 2003Mccurley Kevin Snow, Benjamin Clay ReedSecure user-level tunnels on the internet
    EP-0838930-A2April 29, 1998Digital Equipment CorporationPseudonetzwerkadapter zur Rahmenaufnahme, -einkapselung und -verschlüsselung
    US-6934288-B2August 23, 2005Nec CorporationFragmentation processing device and fragmentation processing apparatus using thereof
    US-2003217126-A1November 20, 2003Polcha Andrew J., Polcha Michael P.System and method for automatically configuring remote computer
    US-2007110046-A1May 17, 2007Farrell Richard S, Rolland David J, Signorelli James RInternet protocol optimizer
    US-2006142878-A1June 29, 2006Siemens AktiengesellschaftSystem for virtual process interfacing via a remote desktop protocol (rdp)
    US-2002029285-A1March 07, 2002Henry CollinsAdapting graphical data, processing activity to changing network conditions
    US-2002156927-A1October 24, 2002Alacritech, Inc.TCP/IP offload network interface device
    US-2002049608-A1April 25, 2002Hartsell Neal D., Fernander Robert B., Jackson Gregory J., Johnson Scott C., Qiu Chaoxin C., Richter Roger K.Systems and methods for providing differentiated business services in information management environments
    US-2005033858-A1February 10, 2005Swildens Eric Sven-Johan, Day Richard David, Gupta Ajit K.Load balancing service
    US-7458095-B2November 25, 2008Nokia Siemens Networks OyFaster authentication with parallel message processing
    US-7069234-B1June 27, 2006Accenture LlpInitiating an agreement in an e-commerce environment
    US-2004098486-A1May 20, 2004Jun Gu, John KerrPredictive branching and caching method and apparatus for applications
    US-2003110296-A1June 12, 2003Kirsch Steven T., Murray David J.Method and system for reducing network latency in data communication
    US-7047424-B2May 16, 2006Corente, Inc.Methods and systems for hairpins in virtual networks
    US-7159014-B2January 02, 2007Fineground NetworksMethod and system for efficient and automated version management of embedded objects in web documents
    US-2005144481-A1June 30, 2005Chris Hopen, Gary Tomlinson, Parvez Anandam, Brian Young, Alan FlaggEnd point control
    US-2004039827-A1February 26, 2004Neoteris, Inc.Method and system for providing secure access to private networks with client redirection
    US-7007092-B2February 28, 2006Juniper Networks, Inc.Connection management system and method
    US-7206811-B2April 17, 2007Oracle International Corp.System and method for facilitating real-time collaborating by collapsing a queue for a slow client
    US-2002163882-A1November 07, 2002Akamai Technologies, Inc.Optimal route selection in a content delivery network
    US-7165041-B1January 16, 2007Accenture, LlpWeb-based architecture sales tool
    US-2003026241-A1February 06, 2003Hideaki Ono, Tsuguo Kato, Ryuichi Takechi, Keiichi Nakatsugawa, Akiko Tamai, Kazuyuki OkaPacket transfer method for hierarchical packet network, hierarchical packet communication system, and gate node, edge node and mobile terminal for use with hierarchical packet communication system, as well as handover method and routing node for packet network
    US-2002152423-A1October 17, 2002Mccabe HarryPersistent session and data in transparently distributed objects
    US-2005210150-A1September 22, 2005Microsoft CorporationDynamic session maintenance for mobile computing devices
    US-2004044731-A1March 04, 2004Kailai Chen, John Gnip, Richard Dubilier, Michael CorcoranSystem and method for optimizing internet applications
    US-2002147822-A1October 10, 2002Netscaler, Inc.Internet client-server multiplexer
    US-2003212776-A1November 13, 2003Roberts David Gary, Hansell Jeffrey Stuart, Mahesh KumarMethods and systems for changing a topology of a network
    US-2004103150-A1May 27, 2004Intercall, Inc.Method and system for providing a presentation on a network
    US-7386631-B1June 10, 2008At&T Corp.Apparatus and methods for providing translucent proxies in a communications network
    US-7225244-B2May 29, 2007Ciena CorporationCommon command interface
    US-2005267974-A1December 01, 2005Citrix Systems, Inc.Systems and methods for maintaining a client's network connection thru a change in network identifier
    US-7188273-B2March 06, 2007Tsx Inc.System and method for failover
    US-7194761-B1March 20, 2007Cisco Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatus providing automatic client authentication
    US-2002026478-A1February 28, 2002Rodgers Edward B., Steinier Hugues P., Leonard Thomas R.Method and apparatus for forming linked multi-user groups of shared software applications
    US-2003084165-A1May 01, 2003Openwave Systems Inc.User-centric session management for client-server interaction using multiple applications and devices
    US-2003217149-A1November 20, 2003International Business Machines CorporationMethod and apparatus for tunneling TCP/IP over HTTP and HTTPS
    US-7152092-B2December 19, 2006Indeliq, Inc.Creating chat rooms with multiple roles for multiple participants
    US-2003112809-A1June 19, 2003Bharali Anupam A., Balraj Singh, Sampat Manish H., Singh Amit P., Rajiv BatraEfficient method and system for automatic discovery and verification of optimal paths through a dynamic multi-point meshed overlay network
    CN-1410905-AApril 16, 2003华中科技大学Full distribution type aggregation network servicer system
    US-2002138640-A1September 26, 2002Uri Raz, Ytshak Artzi, Yehuda Volk, Shmuel MelamedApparatus and method for improving the delivery of software applications and associated data in web-based systems
    US-7117504-B2October 03, 2006Microsoft CorporationApplication program interface that enables communication for a network software platform
    US-2003182437-A1September 25, 2003Nec CorporationProxy server and proxy control program
    US-2003115421-A1June 19, 2003Mchenry Stephen T., David Veach, Czarnik Paul G., Schroeder Carl J., Zink David S., Dan Koren, Neal Caldecott, Trumbo-Mchenry Shari L.Centralized bounded domain caching control system for network edge servers
    EP-0618708-A2October 05, 1994International Business Machines CorporationLocalisation de ressources dans des réseaux d'ordinateurs ayant des noeuds serveurs avec antémémoires
    US-7219127-B2May 15, 2007Oracle International CorporationControl unit operations in a real-time collaboration server
    US-2002150064-A1October 17, 2002Thierry LucidarmeUnit for transmitting data blocks in acknowledged mode on a channel featuring a radio link with a mobile station
    US-2005246346-A1November 03, 2005Gerdes Reiner J, Davis Samuel D, Dudar Joseph A, Fred StearnsSecured authentication in a dynamic IP environment
    US-2004100976-A1May 27, 2004Industrial Technology Research InstituteDynamic network address translation system and method of transparent private network device
    US-2004225911-A1November 11, 2004International Business Machines CorporationApparatus and method for dynamically rerouting a network request based on shared predictive failure information
    US-2004258003-A1December 23, 2004Mathias Kokot, Hermann Rodler, Kurt Melden, Thomas Gemmer, Jerome MoisandControlling data link layer elements with network layer elements
    US-2002126675-A1September 12, 2002Ntt Docomo, Inc.Packet transmission method and system, and packet transmitting apparatus, packet receiving apparatus, and packet transmitting/receiving apparatus
    US-7225040-B2May 29, 2007Exxon Mobil Oil CorporationMethod and system for reducing lead-time in the packaging industry
    US-7212296-B2May 01, 2007Microsoft CorporationUse of queues
    WO-2005088476-A1September 22, 2005First Hop OyProcede et dispositif d'integration d'un client d'acceleration dans une application
    US-2003046587-A1March 06, 2003Satyam Bheemarasetti, Chandra PrathuriSecure remote access using enterprise peer networks
    US-7120666-B2October 10, 2006Riverbed Technology, Inc.Transaction accelerator for client-server communication systems
    US-2005246445-A1November 03, 2005Citrix Systems, Inc.Systems and methods for maintaining a session between a client and host service
    US-2003233423-A1December 18, 2003Dilley John A., Berkheimer Andrew D.Method and system for tiered distribution in a content delivery network
    US-2002174227-A1November 21, 2002Hartsell Neal D., Fernander Robert B., Jackson Gregory J., Johnson Scott C., Qiu Chaoxin C., Richter Roger K.Systems and methods for prioritization in information management environments
    US-7340772-B2March 04, 2008Citrix Systems, Inc.Systems and methods for continuing an operation interrupted from a reconnection between a client and server
    US-2006274828-A1December 07, 2006A4S Security, Inc.High capacity surveillance system with fast search capability
    US-7420992-B1September 02, 2008Packeteer, Inc.Adaptive network traffic compression mechanism including dynamic selection of compression algorithms
    US-2002065864-A1May 30, 2002Hartsell Neal D., Fernander Robert B., Jackson Gregory J., Johnson Scott C., Qiu Chaoxin C., Richter Roger K.Systems and method for resource tracking in information management environments
    US-2002083175-A1June 27, 2002Wanwall, Inc. (A Delaware Corporation)Methods and apparatus for protecting against overload conditions on nodes of a distributed network
    US-2003112823-A1June 19, 2003Microsoft CorporationMethods and systems for establishing communications through firewalls and network address translators
    US-2006185010-A1August 17, 2006Symantec CorporationNetwork address translation gateway for local area networks using local IP addresses and non-translatable port addresses
    US-2004128252-A1July 01, 2004Sony CorporationInformation processing device, contents distribution server, license server, and method and computer program
    US-2002107903-A1August 08, 2002Richter Roger K., Hernandez Gustavo G., Ho WangMethods and systems for the order serialization of information in a network processing environment
    US-6831898-B1December 14, 2004Cisco Systems, Inc.Multiple packet paths to improve reliability in an IP network
    US-7409708-B2August 05, 2008Microsoft CorporationAdvanced URL and IP features
    US-6974928-B2December 13, 2005Breakthrough Logistics CorporationMethod and apparatus for efficient package delivery and storage
    US-2002107962-A1August 08, 2002Richter Roger K., Bailey Brian W., Ho WangSingle chassis network endpoint system with network processor for load balancing
    US-2003177389-A1September 18, 2003Zone Labs, Inc.System and methodology for security policy arbitration
    US-2003140121-A1July 24, 2003Intensifi, Inc., A California CorporationMethod and apparatus for access to, and delivery of, multimedia information
    US-2003069941-A1April 10, 2003Christopher PeifferString matching method and device
    US-2002081971-A1June 27, 2002Franco TravostinoSystem, device, and method for maintaining communication sessions in a communication system
    US-2003055883-A1March 20, 2003Wiles Philip V.Synthetic transaction monitor
    US-6850252-B1February 01, 2005Steven M. HoffbergIntelligent electronic appliance system and method
    US-2003131079-A1July 10, 2003Ems Technologies, Inc.Performance enhancing proxy techniques for internet protocol traffic
    US-2002116452-A1August 22, 2002Surgient Networks, Inc.Network connected computing system including storage system
    US-2007130334-A1June 07, 2007Carley Jeffrey AOut-of-band remote management station
    US-2002152373-A1October 17, 2002Chih-Tang Sun, Kiho Yum, Matthews Abraham R.Tunnel interface for securing traffic over a network
    US-2006018332-A1January 26, 2006Nokia CorporationSystem and method for increasing data throughout using a block acknowledgement
    US-2004049515-A1March 11, 2004Hyperspace Communications, Inc.Third party authentication of files in digital systems
    US-2004143734-A1July 22, 2004Buer Mark L., Mcdaniel Scott S., Uri Elzur, Tardo Joseph J., Kan FanData path security processing
    US-2003105977-A1June 05, 2003International Business Machines CorporationOffload processing for secure data transfer
    US-2001049741-A1December 06, 2001Bryan D. Skene, Scott P. Tennican, Thomas E. KeeMethod and system for balancing load distribution on a wide area network
    US-2003154239-A1August 14, 2003Davis Andrew Thomas, Jay Parikh, Srinivasan Pichai, Eddie Ruvinsky, Daniel Stodolsky, Mark Tsimelzon, Weihl William E.Java application framework for use in a content delivery network (CDN)
    US-2002032798-A1March 14, 2002Wei XuSystems and methods for packet sequencing
    US-7512702-B1March 31, 2009Cisco Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus providing highly scalable server load balancing

NO-Patent Citations (99)

    Title
    Advisory Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/039,946 dated Mar. 24, 2009.
    Advisory action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,091 dated May 6, 2009.
    Advisory Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,092 dated Apr. 24, 2009.
    Advisory Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,656 dated Jul. 29, 2009.
    Canadian Office Action for CA 2545496 dated Feb. 15, 2011.
    EP Communication for EP Patent Application No. 07007414.1 dated Jun. 5, 2008. (6 pages).
    EP Communication for European Patent Application No. 05776653.7 dated Oct. 5, 2007. (7 pages).
    EP Communication from EP Patent Application No. 05 785 297.2, dated May 18, 2007, 2 pages.
    EP Search Report for EP 10184310.0 dated Dec. 9, 2010.
    EP Search Report for EP 10184317.5 dated Dec. 7, 2010.
    EP Summons to Oral Proceedings for EP 05776653.7 dated Jan. 14, 2011.
    European Search Report for European Patent Application No. EP 07007414 dated Jul. 16, 2007. (2 pages).
    Exam Report for AU 2005266943 dated May 14, 2009.
    Exam Report for AU 2005272779 dated Apr. 23, 2009.
    Exam Report for AU appl. 2005266945 dated Jul. 21, 2009.
    Exam Report for EP appl. 05776653.7 dated Apr. 2009.
    Exam report for EP appl. 05785297.2 dated Jun. 19, 2009.
    Exam Report for EP appl. 070074141 dated Nov. 17, 2009.
    Examination report for AU 2005266945 dated Jul. 21, 2009.
    Examination report for EP 05785297.2 dated Aug. 19, 2009.
    Final Office Action dated Dec. 23, 2008 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 11/188,279. 12 pages.
    Final Office Action dated Dec. 9, 2008 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 11/187,562. 15 pages.
    International Search Report for PCT/US05/26296. Dated Jan. 31, 2006.
    International Search Report for PCT/US2005/022884, mailed on Jul. 8, 2008.
    International Search Report for PCT/US2005/026300, Mailing date: Dec. 16, 2005. 3 pages.
    International Search Report for PCT/US2005/028663, Mailing date: Nov. 16, 2005. 3 pages.
    International Search Report to PCT/US04/37918, mailed on Apr. 27, 2008, 1 page.
    International Search Report to PCT/US2005/026296, mailed on Jan. 31, 2006, 5 pgs.
    Ipswitch Inc., WSFTP User's Guide, Chapter 8: Security, Jun. 25, 2003, 8 pages.
    Japanese Office Action for JP 2007-519353 dated Jul. 16, 2010.
    Japanese Office Action for JP 2007-522843 dated Dec. 1, 2010.
    Korean Office Action for KR 2006-7009144 dated Jan. 14, 2011.
    Non Final Office Action dated Aug. 15, 2008 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,090 25 pages.
    Non Final Office Action dated Aug. 20, 2008 for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,092.
    Non Final Office Action dated Aug. 20, 2008 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,092. (16 pages).
    Non Final Office Action dated Aug. 5, 2008 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,091. 17 pages.
    Non Final Office Action dated Dec. 11, 2007 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 10/683,881. 10 pages.
    Non Final Office Action dated Jan. 24, 2008 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 10/988,004. 6 pages.
    Non Final Office Action dated Jun. 10, 2008 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 11/187,562. 15 pages.
    Non Final Office Action dated Jun. 23, 2008 for U.S. Appl. No. 11/039,946. (14 pages).
    Non Final Office Action dated Jun. 26, 2008 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 11/188,279. 12 pages.
    Non Final Office Action dated Oct. 28, 2008 pertaining to U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,656. 21 pages.
    Noriaki Kobayashi, "Internet VPN", N+1 Network Guide, vol. 3, No. 9, Oct. 1, 2003, pp. 44-49. (9 pages).
    Notice of Acceptance for AU 2010214746 dated Nov. 2, 2010.
    Notice of Acceptance for AU Appl. 2005266943 dated May 28, 2010. (3 pages).
    Notice of Acceptance for AU Appl. 2005272779 dated May 26, 2010. (3 pages).
    Notice of Allowance dated Jun. 17, 2009 U.S. Appl. No. US 11/188,279.
    Notice of Allowance dated Sep. 18, 2008. USPTO U.S. Appl. No. 10/988,004 5 pgs.
    Notice of Allowance for U.S. Appl. No. 11/039,946 dated Mar. 7, 2010.
    Notice of Allowance for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,092 dated Jun. 11, 2009.
    Notice of Allowance for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,656 dated Sep. 18, 2009.
    Notice of Allowance for U.S. Appl. No. 11/188,279 dated Jun. 29, 2009.
    Notice of Allowance on U.S. Appl. No. 12/557,497 dated May 6, 2011.
    Notice of Allowance on U.S. Appl. No. 12/560,154 dated May 2, 2011.
    Office Action dated Sep. 26, 2008 from Chinese Application No. 200480040249.X corresponding to U.S. Appl. No. 10/988,004 22 pgs.
    Office Action for AU appl. 2005266943 dated May 14, 2009.
    Office Action for AU appl. 2005272779 dated Apr. 23, 2009.
    Office Action for CN appl. 00480040249.X dated Jun. 19, 2009.
    Office Action for CN Appl. 200580030928.3 dated Apr. 23, 2010.(5 pages).
    Office Action for CN appl. 200580034849.X dated Sep. 25, 2009.
    Office Action for CN Appl. 200580034849X dated Apr. 7, 2010.(5 pages).
    Office Action for CN Appl. 200580034849X dated Aug. 3, 2010.(9 pages).
    Office Action for CN appln 200580028535 dated Jan. 15, 2010.
    Office action for European Application No. 05776653.7. Dated Oct. 5, 2007. 7 Pages.
    Office Action for IN Appl. 1514KOLNP2006 dated Sep. 7, 2010. (3 pages).
    Office Action for JP Appl. 2006-539930 dated Feb. 12, 2010. (3 pages).
    Office Action for JP Appl. 2007-048002 dated Nov. 1, 2010. (7 pages).
    Office Action for JP Appl. 2007-048003 dated Nov. 1, 2010. (7 pages).
    Office Action for JP Appl. 2007-519353 dated Jul. 12, 2010. (6 pages).
    Office Action for JP Appl. 2007-522841 dated Sep. 10, 2010. (9 pages).
    Office Action for JP Appl. 2007-525810 dated Aug. 4, 2010.(9 pages).
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. 11/161,090 dated Oct. 15, 2010. (29 pages).
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/039,946 dated Jan. 23, 2009.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/039,946 dated Jun. 23, 2009.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/039,946 mailed on Jun. 23, 2008, 11 pages.
    Office action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,090 dated Feb. 4, 2009.
    Office action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,090 dated Jan. 6, 2010.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,090 dated Jun. 10, 2010. (30 pages).
    Office action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,091 dated Aug. 3, 2009.
    Office action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,091 dated Feb. 18, 2009.
    Office action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,091 dated Feb. 24, 2010.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,092 dated Feb. 12, 2009.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,093 dated Oct. 1, 2010.10 pages.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/187,512 dated Dec. 23, 2009.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/187,512 dated Jun. 22, 2010. (32 pages).
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/187,512 dated Mar. 3, 2009.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/187,512 dated Sep. 15, 2009.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/187,562 dated Apr. 27, 2009.
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/188,274 dated Sep. 8, 2010.(19 pages).
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 11/188274 dated Mar. 29, 2010. (15 pages).
    Office Action for U.S. Appl. No. 12/557,497 dated Nov. 19, 2010. (25 pages).
    Restriction Requirement for U.S. Appl. No. 11/161,093 dated Jul. 26, 2010.(9 pages).
    Teruhara Serada, "SSL VPN", N+1 Network, vol. 4, No. 8, Aug. 1, 2004, pp. 76-79. (8 pages).
    Written Opinion of the International Searching Authority to PCT/US04/37918, mailed on Apr. 27, 2005, 7 pages.
    Written Opinion of the International Searching Authority to PCT/US2005/026296, mailed on Jan. 31, 2006.
    Written Opinion of the International Searching Authority to PCT/US2005/026300; Mailed on Dec. 16, 2005, 7 pages.
    Written Opinion of the International Searching Authority to PCT/US2005/028663; Mailed on Nov. 16, 2005, 7 pages.
    Written Opinion of the ISA for PCT/US2005/022884, mailed on Jul. 8, 2008.
    Yoshikazu Kobayashi, VPN service introduction, Computer & Network LAN, vol. 21, No. 3, Mar. 1, 2003, pp. 25-40.(19 pages).

Cited By (10)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-2013036416-A1February 07, 2013Vmware, Inc.Detecting and correcting network interruptions using network address translation
    US-8813074-B2August 19, 2014Vmware, Inc.Detecting and correcting network interruptions using network address translation
    US-8848710-B2September 30, 2014Citrix Systems, Inc.System and method for performing flash caching of dynamically generated objects in a data communication network
    US-8892778-B2November 18, 2014Citrix Systems, Inc.Method and systems for securing remote access to private networks
    US-8914522-B2December 16, 2014Citrix Systems, Inc.Systems and methods for facilitating a peer to peer route via a gateway
    US-8954595-B2February 10, 2015Citrix Systems, Inc.Systems and methods for providing client-side accelerated access to remote applications via TCP buffering
    US-9055032-B2June 09, 2015Blackberry LimitedSecure network tunnel between a computing device and an endpoint
    US-9219579-B2December 22, 2015Citrix Systems, Inc.Systems and methods for client-side application-aware prioritization of network communications
    US-9571450-B2February 14, 2017Vmware, Inc.Detecting and correcting network interruptions using network address translation
    US-9825914-B2November 21, 2017Blackberry LimitedSecure network tunnel between a computing device and an endpoint